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Recent Audio Podcasts

The unique species of the tufted deer

A light brown tufted deer outside facing the camera, with one large tooth visible pointing down

This small species lives throughout southern China, from high eastern Tibetan mountains to low coastal mountains, preferring forests and shrubby habitats. And its most interesting feature is its tusks.

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Virtual reality and yawning

A person with a VR headset over their eyes and headphones on, looking off to the side

There’s a big gap between how we act in virtual reality and how we act in real life, as scientists who did an experiment focused on yawning found out.

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Not all antioxidants are the same

Blueberries in a white bowl on a wood checkered table

We've heard a lot about how antioxidants can help prevent disease. Does that mean we should eat as many antioxidant-rich foods as possible?

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Moths use acoustic camouflage

A Prometha moth with its wings open resting on a green leaf

Most moth species are active at night. It must be really dangerous to be a moth. Luckily, they've developed a few ways to protect themselves.

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Why do humans like coffee?

Two lattes on a wooden table with leaf designs on their surface

Scientists think that animals evolved the ability to detect bitter tastes in order to avoid things that are harmful or even poisonous. So why do we like coffee?

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A Moment of Science Blog

Surprising Science: How Fungi Can Help Conquer The Final Frontier

The fibers of mycelium in mushrooms cover a large area

Today's Surprising Science looks at the emerging field of astromycology and how fungi might just hold the key to our space exploration efforts.

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Surprising Science: Bacteria Working As Art Restorers

Carlo Bononi’s Incoronazione della Virgine

Our last Surprising Science took us out of this world to learn more about how scientists determine potentially habitable planets. Today, we’re back on Earth to look at how some of our smallest life forms are impacting the art world.

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The Traveling Lazarus Lizard

A lazarus lizard sitting on a rock

How does introducing a new species impact an environment? The unique case of the Lazarus lizard shows there's more than one possible outcome.

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Surprising Science: Geology In Space

Outer space with tons of stars visible

Scientific breakthroughs can come from some surprising sources. Today's episode of Surprising Science looks at how different branches can create breakthroughs in other fields.

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Surprising Science: How The Film "Frozen" Helped Solve A Cold Case

A snowy treeline in front of a large mountain

Scientific breakthroughs can come from surprising sources. In the second installment of this series, we look at another recent example of this.

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