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Did Agriculture Change Human Language?

Wild Science: Eastern Box Turtle

Eastern Box Turtles use geo-imprinting navigation.

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Wild Science: Turkey Vultures

The turkey vulture is supremely adapted for eating only dead things.

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Wild Science: The California Sea Lion

Wild Science headed to the Indianapolis Zoo to learn more about California Sea Lions.

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Wild Science: Orangutans

Wild Science visits the Indianapolis Zoo, where staff explain the intelligence and behavior of orangutans, and how their species is being threatened by humans.

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Why You Can’t Knock Down a Clown

Remember those inflatable clowns that stood about three feet high and had big red noses, meant for punching? Hit the clown as hard as you could, right back up.

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Haven’t We Met?

If you suffered from the neurological disorder called "facial agnosia," you might not recognize the faces of close friends and family. How could this happen?

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How Do You Make A Diet-Coke Float?

Here is an at home experiment you can try! Learn about molecular density!

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Wild Science: Timber Rattlesnakes

Rattlesnakes are an important component of our ecosystem, but are also potentially dangerous to humans.

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Wild Science: Opossums

They may look gross and scary, but that's just them playing "opossum." We visit Wildcare Inc., to find out more about the "garbage collector of the forest."

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American Columbo

The American Columbo plant doesn't flower until close to its 30th birthday, and then it promptly gives up the ghost.

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Flowers Are Able To Choose Who Pollinates Them

While studying Heliconia flowers in Costa Rica, biologists noticed that they were clearly choosing their pollinators, but they still didn’t know how the flowers could tell one hummingbird from another.

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Entomologists found that potato leafhoppers, which are migratory pests, arrived in the fields an average of 10 days earlier in 2012 than they did in the early 1950s.

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The Limitations of Weather Forecasts

Researchers at Pennsylvania State University did a collaborative study in which they tried to find the ultimate limit of how far out we could predict the weather.

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A Moment of Science Blog

The Oldest Tree In Europe

The oldest tree in Europe is a 1,230 year-old Heldreich's pine living in southern Italy.

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Was There An Opium Trade In The Bronze Age?

A chemical analysis of a Bronze Age jug found in Egypt might finally vindicate an old theory that jugs like it contained opium.

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Inside The Heads Of Neanderthals

A growing body of research has slowly revealed a number of characteristics Neanderthals shared with humans.

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