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Babs Gonzales

Babs Gonzales was the toastmaster of the bebop world, a vocalese hipster who made the scene and lived to sing and write about it.

The Platters

Jazz standards like “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes” and “A Sunday Kind of Love” are not just for singers like Frank Sinatra. This week, we’ll hear the Great American Songbook sung by The Flamingos, The Platters, and other doo wop groups from the 1950s.

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Celebrating those who help us become who we are.

Flinora Frazier (nee Meyers) meeting Langston Hughes

Three stories. One about the challenges of accessing books in prison. One about how overlooking a neighborhood’s history has affected the place. One about a comic book artist who has yet to experience writers’ block.

Browse our playlist for this week's show.

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Stories from around Indiana...coming to you from the City Market Catacombs.

student activists holding signs and marching

As the 1960s neared to a close, the jazz world continued to absorb the cultural upheavals of a volatile decade.

From Diego Ortiz’s 1553 publication Trattado de glosas

Music theorists help us understand how to play and analyze music, and also shed light on how music was constructed in past eras. This hour on Harmonia, we’ll explore the work of three Renaissance theorists.

Old woman's hand

Via Zoom from Prague, Bronislava Volková reads "There is no intermediary," "There is no time, only water," "Thre is a way of Chestnut trees," "We are the orphans of the meadows and drink," "Dear Fufi," and "The deaf and dumb hand."

Open Ended Interview promo record

... OK, that should be "interview." A virtual conversation, using a very analog-era practice, in which I chat with the Duke about his work on the film score for ANATOMY OF A MURDER.

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Duke Ellington Anatomy of a Murder

In the mid-20th century Black jazz artists began to make inroads into the movie industry scoring films such as Anatomy Of A Murder and Odds Against Tomorrow.

We get comfortable in the 5th month of the year with music surrounding May's birth flower: Lily of the Valley.

Detail from Karl Brullov's The Last Day of Pompeii

Psalms are an important part of both Jewish and Christian rituals, perfectly suited to intimate, congregational, and ceremonial music settings. Last week on Harmonia, we heard Latin versions of a Psalm that begins "Out of the depths I have cried to thee.” This week, we’ll explore some settings in German and English.

Austin Davis

Austin Davis reads "The World Will End Tonight," "Lotus & Fear," and "Lotus & Love.

Fred Astaire

Put on your dancing shoes as we cut a rug with the American Songbook. On this episode, we look at jazz standards meant for dancing, including “I Could Have Danced All Night” and “Cheek To Cheek.”

Union Square.

If we are not exposed to someone's handwriting, that is one less distinctive characteristic available to us.

Son House

Adriane Pontecorvo reviews Forever on My Mind, a new release from Easy Eye Sound of a 1964 Wabash College concert by bluesman Son House

People from Bloomington

In 1980, the Indonesian fiction writer Budi Darma published a book of short stories called People from Bloomington. The English translation came out this month. This week on Inner States, translator Tiffany Tsao on Indonesian literature, Budi Darma, and Twitter.

Browse our playlist for this week's Ether Game.

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Stories from around Indiana...coming to you from the Morgan County History Center and Museum in Martinsville.

Detail from "The Last Day of Pompeii" by Karl Brullov, 1830-1833

Psalms are an important part of both Jewish and Christian rituals, perfectly suited to musical settings of many kinds. This week on Harmonia, we'll look at Latin versions of a Psalm that begins "Out of the depths I have cried to thee.” Plus, music from a C17 French harpsichord manuscript… found on eBay of all places!

Something Cool Mono

In the early 1950s, singer June Christy broke away from Stan Kenton’s Orchestra to record solo, helping to establish the “vocal cool” style of jazz singing. This week, we’ll explore some of those early solo recordings she made for Capitol Records.

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This time out, songs and stories that span the spectrum.

Mingus Spoken Word

On this edition of Night Lights it's "Word From Mingus," a program of Charles Mingus' 1950s spoken-word collaborations with poet Langston Hughes, monologuist Jean Shepherd, and actor Melvin Stewart. We'll also hear Mingus' own performance of his piece "Chill of Death," written when Mingus was...

Kate Schneider

The graphic novel Headland is about a woman in a hospital, the wilderness she visits in her mind, and the tortoise she meets there. It’s also about the medicalization of death and dying. This week, we talk with the author, Kate Schneider. Plus, Midwestern Movies, with Alicia Kozma.

Two Women at a Window painting

This hour, we’ll meet 3 mysteriously related, musically intricate French songs, each beginning with the words “While waiting…” We’ll also meet their common musical and poetical ancestor, which does NOT begin with those words. Intrigued?

Browse our playlist from this week's show.

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