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Arts & Culture

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Room packed full of items, hoarder's den

Eric Rensberger reads "Reading," "A Deity," and "Historical Imagination."

The Platters

Jazz standards like “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes” and “A Sunday Kind of Love” are not just for singers like Frank Sinatra. This week, we’ll hear the Great American Songbook sung by The Flamingos, The Platters, and other doo wop groups from the 1950s.

postcard of two people by a lake

Yes, they depart for warmer climates in the winter. But their intention is always to return.

Bloomington's Skeleton Harvester in the studio

This week, a profile of the alien who roams downtown Bloomington, a werewolf, two witches, and the childhood that led to an article about the secret government facility under Bloomington's water treatment plant. Plus, a discussion about how shapeshifters help us think about gender.

Bloomington's Skeleton Harvester in the studio

Duke Ellington, Oliver Nelson, John Carter, and Wynton Marsalis all undertook a weighty artistic task-to represent the historical journey of African-Americans in music. Historian Michael McGerr joins the program as we play music from all four composers' extended works and talk about their place in jazz history.

Browse the playlist from this week's show

Lute song in a garden

From epic tales of Charlemagne’s knights to sonnets drenched in lovers’ tears, the act of singing poetry is central to many early music traditions, both improvised and on the page. This week on Harmonia, we’ll hear musical manifestations of poetry ranging from Antiquity to the seventeenth century. Join us!

Erica Anderson Senter 3

Erica Anderson-Senter reads "Qualifications for a Lover," "This is How a Poet Gets Over Heartbreak," and "To the Red-Bellied Woodpecker in my Neighborhood."

Dakota Staton Dynamic

This week on Afterglow, we take a listen to the work of jazz vocalist Dakota Staton, famous for her work on Capitol Records in the 1950s, including her rendition of the song “The Late, Late Show.”

porchlight_ep_70_wayside_inn.jpg

Inside a journey to Atlantic, Iowa, that amounted to a pilgrimage.

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Billy Taylor jazz pianist

Billy Taylor was a jazz pianist, educator, broadcaster, composer of a civil rights anthem, and the man who dubbed jazz “America’s classical music.”

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Sisters of St. Benedict, Ray Bradbury, Doctor Who, and Abbott's Candies.

Browse the playlist for this week's show

The Abandoned by Sandro Botticelli

This week, we’re exploring one of “greatest hits” of the Renaissance: a love song called “Je suis desheritée,” and we’ll hear settings by composers as famous as Lassus and Gombert. Plus, we’ll feature Ensemble Dragma’s recording Song of Beasts: Fantastic Creatures in Medieval Songs.

Person walking dog in woods with sunbeams

Shana Ritter reads "Day Light Savings Time," "avenoir," "Branches," and "Redemption."

Two Williams

This week, we explore the songs of two unrelated black jazz composers from the early 20th century: Spencer Williams and Clarence Williams. These two Louisiana natives wrote early jazz standards like “Basin Street Blues” and “Baby Won't You Please Come Home.”

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A look back at a long journey.

Historian Cory Haala in a Midwest map shirt

It’s easy to want to fight our political enemies, but it’s often more effective to out-organize them. On this week’s Inner States, we look back to a time – not so long ago – when Midwesterners did just that. Historian Cory Haala tells us about Progressive Populists in the 1980s and 1990s.

Mel Powell was still a teenager when he joined one of America’s most popular big bands on the cusp of World War II, launching a brief but notable jazz career as a pianist, composer and arranger, before going on to devote most of his life to classical music.

Soprano Siyi Yan (Setsuko)

A new opera examines possessions as symbols of home, connection, and of the soul

We are not accepting responses at the website this week while our staff is away, but you can view tonight's playlist and check your game!

John Duncan's painting of Tristan and Isolde

On this edition of Harmonia, we’re collecting music named after specific people. These eponymous tunes have namesakes ranging from tragic to notorious and historical to legendary, so join as we explore the wide variety of song, dance, and chamber music they inspired over the centuries.

Hand taking family picture with cell phone

Lori Hoevener reads "Risk," "A Bracelet of Memories," and "Family Pictures."

Esperanza Spalding and Fred Hersch

Get a preview of some of the vocal jazz and traditional pop Grammy nominees before the February 4th ceremony, including artists like Cécile McLorin Salvant, Esperanza Spalding, Samara Joy, and more.

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A tribute to the power of the female voice.

Sam Shoaf

Sam’s day job involves removing invasive plants and restoring native ones. Fire is one of the ways he does that. He’s a lifelong hunter, too - that’s what got him into landscape restoration. This week, a walk in the woods with Sam Shoaf.

A pair of Hoosier artists, Carmel's roundabouts, and a festival of ice.

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