Give Now

Afterglow Jazz and American Popular Song

Round Midnight: Songs For The Evening

"You And The Night And The Music," "Night And Day," "Midnight Sun," and more songs for nighttime people on this episode of Afterglow.

weesmallhours

Photo: Album Cover

Frank Sinatra's 1955 Capitol recording "In The Wee Small Hours" is a classic album about loneliness, nightlife, and lost love—themes that show up again and again in jazz's nighttime songs.

Jazz and nighttime have always gone hand-in-hand. You can argue that the best jazz is made at night. After all, both can be full of mystery, longing, and solitude. On this episode of Afterglow, I walk you through some of the finest nighttime songs from the Great American Songbook, including “Round Midnight,” “In The Wee Small Hours,” “All Through The Night,” “You And The Night And The Music,” and “In The Still Of The Night,” sung by Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, June Christy, Julie London, and more.

Music Heard On This Episode

Loading...
Mark Chilla

Mark Chilla, originally from Atlanta, GA, is the Production Director at WFIU, where he also hosts Ether Game and Afterglow. He studied music theory at Indiana University and taught various music theory courses at IU and Butler University. He enjoys film, woodworking, learning new instruments and the Beatles.

View all posts by this author »

Stay Connected

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Afterglow:

Support For Indiana Public Media Comes From

About Afterglow

About The Host

Search Afterglow

This Week On Night Lights

1963: A Man’s Dream, A Nation’s Nightmare

The LP cover for Andrew Hill's Blue Note album BLACK FIRE.

It was a year of raised hopes and devastating tragedy, and the world of jazz continued to reflect both the growing unease and the youthful vitality of the times

Read more »

Night Lights is WFIU's weekly program of classic jazz hosted by David Brent Johnson.

More from Night Lights »