Noon Edition

Indiana’s Voter Photo ID Law

We’ll talk with our panelists about whether Indiana’s policy deters voters or whether it prevents fraud.

In 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld an Indiana law requiring voters to show government-issued photo ID’s at the polls, and other states are now following Indiana's lead.

Photo: Noah Coffey (Flickr)

In 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld an Indiana law requiring voters to show government-issued photo ID’s at the polls, and other states are now following Indiana's lead.

In 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld an Indiana law requiring voters to show government-issued photo ID’s at the polls, and other states are now following Indiana’s lead. States like Pennsylvania and Kansas passed photo voter ID laws this spring that are similar to Indiana’s law and require voters to present specific kinds of photo identification.

Some voters’ rights groups say the laws are politically motivated and that they disenfranchise certain voters. Others say that the laws keep voter rolls in order and prevent voter fraud. This week on Noon Edition, we’ll talk with our panelists about whether Indiana’s policy deters voters or whether it prevents fraud.

Join us Friday at 12 p.m. with your questions for our guests as they talk about the state of Indiana’s historic places. Visit this site to be part of our live chat, follow us on Twitter @NoonEdition, or join us on the air by calling in at 812-855-0811 or 1-877-285-WFIU.

Guests

Albrecht Holschuh – Member of the League of Women Voters of Indiana

Abdul Hakim-Shabazz - Attorney with Lewis and Wilkins in Indianapolis, and a political commentator

Brad King – Co-director (R) of the Indiana Election Division

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