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WTIU LGBT Pride Month Programming

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WTIU is celebrating LGBT Pride Month this June with special programming! Tune in to discover the history of LGBT people in the US and their fight for civil rights and social acceptance. 

WAITING ROOM: TRANSGENDER PEOPLE AND HEALTH CARE
Sunday, June 9 at 1pm

Transgender is an umbrella term that is used to describe people whose birth sex is not aligned with their self-defined gender identity. Transgender people face discrimination from society in general and may have difficulty accessing even basic health care. Narrated by Indiana University's Dr. Kand McQueen, this program presents moving stories of transgender people facing discrimination, sexual abuse, and even death in health care settings. Guidelines for promoting respectful interactions and improving the health care experience for transgender people provide a call to action.

VICIOUS
Sunday, June 9 at 7pm

Chart a year in the life of Freddie (Ian McKellen) and Stuart (Derek Jacobi) as they enjoy their inheritance and a birthday. Violet (Frances de la Tour) moves on from her divorce and Ash (Iwan Rheon) arrives with news.

STONEWALL UPRISING: AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Tuesday, June 11 at 9pm

Stonewall Uprising explores the dramatic event that launched a worldwide rights movement. Told by those who took part, from drag queens and street hustlers to police detectives, journalists and a former mayor of New York, and featuring a rich trove of archival footage, this film revisits a time when homosexual acts were illegal throughout America, and homosexuality itself was seen as a form of mental illness. Hunted and often entrapped by undercover police in their hometowns, gays from around the U.S. began fleeing to New York in search of a sanctuary. Hounded there still by an aggressive police force, they found refuge in a Mafia-run gay bar in Greenwich Village, the Stonewall Inn. When police raided Stonewall on June 28, 1969, gay men and women did something they had not done before: they fought back. As the streets of New York erupted into violent protests and street demonstrations, the collective anger announced that the gay rights movement had arrived.

CONSIDERING MATTHEW SHEPARD
Wednesday, June 12 at 1pm

In October of 1998, Matthew Shepard was beaten, tortured, and left to die. Twenty years later his legacy is remembered in a unique production that uses music, poetry, and interviews and to explore a pivotal time in our history. When a hate crime is committed, what does it mean to be a victim, a parent, a community member, a perpetrator? How do we learn to be compassionate and find hope in hopeless situations? As a response to this hate crime, Matthew's story is placed into the context of a passion story presented as a three-part oratorio, bringing new depth to a harrowing story of loss and highlighting the role of art and how we react to tragedy. At the heart of this production is the renowned composer Craig Hella Johnson and the Grammy Award-winning choral group Conspirare. We follow the creative process as their art is used to explore how music can be a healing force and lift up voices that are rarely heard.

TERRENCE MCNALLY: AMERICAN MASTERS
Friday, June 14 at 9pm

Explore four-time Tony-winning playwright Terrence McNally's six groundbreaking decades in theater. The film delves into McNally's pursuit of love and inspiration, LGBTQ activism, triumph over addiction and the power of the arts to transform society.

COMING OUT: A 50 YEAR HISTORY
Sunday, June 16 at 7pm

Transgender teen Jazz Jennings narrates this one-hour documentary exploring the history of public gay identity in the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) community from the 1950s through today.

LAVENDER SCARE
Tuesday, June 18 at 9pm

Learn the untold story of how tens of thousands of homosexual federal workers were either fired or denied employment in the 1950s, stirring outrage in the gay community and starting an LGBTQ rights movement with an unlikely hero at the forefront.

TO A MORE PERFECT UNION
Sunday, June 23 at 7pm

A documentary that tells a story of love, marriage and a fight for equality. The film chronicles unlikely heroes—octogenarian Edie Windsor and her attorney, Roberta Kaplan, on their quest for justice: Edie had been forced to pay a huge estate tax bill upon the death of her spouse because the federal government denied federal benefits to same-sex couples—and Edie's spouse was a woman. Deeply offended by this lack of recognition of her more than 40-year relationship with the love of her life, Edie decided to sue the United States government—and won. Windsor and Kaplan's legal and personal journeys are told in their own words, and through interviews with others of the legal team, movement activists, legal analysts, well-known supporters and opponents.

POV: The Gospel of Eureka
Monday, June 24 at 10pm

The spotlight is beaming on drag shows and a passion play in an Arkansas town. With verve, humor and unfailing compassion, The Gospel of Eureka builds unexpected bridges between religious faith and sexual orientation.

INDEPENDENT LENS: Real Boy
Sunday, June 30 at 7pm

Real Boy is the coming-of-age story of Bennett, a trans teenager with dreams of musical stardom. During the first two years of his gender transition, as Bennett works to repair a strained relationship with his family, he is taken under the wing of his friend and musical hero, celebrated trans folk singer Joe Stevens.