Earth Eats: Real Food, Green Living

New Regime Spice Blend

This is my 24/7 spice and can be used all day long. You'll make all your cooking more interesting with a touch of New Regime.

spice rack

Photo: _Josh_Lowe_ (Flickr)

Use those spices taking up space on your spice rack to make a tasty spice blend.

This blend was inspired by garam masala, a warming spice common in India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. I also included some spices that my friends from North Africa use in their couscous and other dishes.

This is my 24/7 spice and can be used all day long. Try it in your hot cereal with raisins and milk for breakfast and on your strawberries flambé at dinner. It accents both the sweet and savory in all it touches. It tastes great on meat, fish, vegetables — everything!

You’ll make all your cooking more interesting with a touch of New Regime.

New Regime Spice Blend

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons coriander seed
  • 2 pieces star anise
  • 1 tablespoon fennel seed
  • 2 teaspoons mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon ginger powder
  • 1 stick cinnamon (1/2
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon white peppercorns
  • 3 bay leaves, dried
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole mace

Cooking Directions

  1. Grind in a spice grinder.
  2. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dark place.

Chef Daniel Orr

Chef Daniel Orr is the owner of FARMbloomington and the author of several cookbooks. He draws from a lifelong curiosity about individual ingredients combined with extensive training in the art of finding food’s true essence and flavor. The result is simple, yet sophisticated; the best of American food tempered by classic European training.

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