Earth Eats: Real Food, Green Living

FDA: Sudden Increase In Reported Illnesses Due To Raw Milk

There have been at least 12 cases in two days of illness due to contaminated raw milk in the Midwest.

Raw milk

Photo: Chiot's Run

If consumers of raw milk are experiencing one or more of the symptoms mentioned below, they should contact their health care provider immediately.

The FDA has released a statement that between March 24-26, 2010, they have received 12 reports of confirmed illnesses due to contaminated raw milk consumption.

They are working with the state health departments of Michigan, Illinois, and Indiana in their investigation.

The source of the contaminated milk was identified as Forest Grove Dairy in Middlebury, Indiana, whose milk was found to contained Campylobacter.

From the FDA press release:

Symptoms of illness caused by various bacteria commonly found in raw milk may include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, headache and body ache. Most healthy individuals recover quickly from illness caused by raw milk. However, some people may have more severe illness, and the harmful bacteria in raw milk can be especially dangerous for pregnant women, the elderly, infants, young children and people with weakened immune systems.

If consumers of raw milk are experiencing one or more of these symptoms after consuming raw milk or food products made from raw milk, they should contact their health care provider immediately.

Read More: U.S. News and World Report wrote an article last year highlighting both the benefits and drawback of raw milk consumption.

Megan Meyer

Megan Meyer was in the company of foodies for most of her formative years. She spent all of her teens working at her town's natural food co-op in South Dakota, and later when she moved to Minneapolis, worked as a produce maven for the nation's longest running collectively-managed food co-op. In 2006, she had the distinct pleasure (and pain) of participating the vendanges, or grape harvest, in the Beaujolais terroire of France, where she developed her compulsion to snip off grape clusters wherever they may hang. In the spring of 2008, Megan interned on NPR's Science Desk in Washington, D.C., where she aided in the coverage of science, health and food policy stories. She joined Indiana Public Media in June, 2009.

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