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Chocolate Truffles, Four Ways

Stephanie Weaver shows us four variations on the theme of chocolaty goodness.

Six chocolate truffles on three rectangular dishes

Photo: Stephanie Weaver (The Recipe Renovator)

These sweets are almost as photogenic as they are scrumptious.

I first had raw chocolate truffles when I happened upon the UliMana brand at Whole Foods. Holy cow! They became my take-along-on-trips treat, so I could resist whatever unhelpful dessert I was being tempted with on the road.

After a while, I decided to try making them myself. Turns out they’re super-easy.

I make them for special occasions, and they’re also regularly requested for our community garden bake sales. If you get agave syrup that meets “raw” criteria, and watch the temperature as you make them, these qualify as raw.

Chocolate Truffles, Four Ways

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces organic cacao butter
  • 4 ounces cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup agave syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla or peppermint extract
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened coconut flakes
  • 1 tablespoon goji berries
  • 1 tablespoon cacao nibs

Cooking Directions

  1. Create a double boiler by finding a metal bowl that fits over a pot of simmering water.
  2. Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with parchment or waxed paper.
  3. Break up or chop up the cacao butter into smaller pieces and add to the bowl over the double boiler. Add the cocoa powder, agave syrup, and vanilla. Mix until completely smooth.
  4. Remove from heat.
  5. Use a teaspoon to measure even amounts of the truffle mixture, rolling each between your palms. Roll each truffle (there should be roughly 24 total) in any of the following coatings: a.) finely-chopped coconut flakes, b.) finely-chopped goji berries, c.) cacao nibs, or d.) cocoa powder.
  6. Set on the baking sheet, then refrigerate until firm.

 

Stephanie Weaver

Stephanie Weaver is a writer and wellness advocate who lives in San Diego. Her specialty is remaking recipes with healthy ingredients: low-sodium, gluten-free and migraine-friendly. She has a Master's in public health in nutrition education from the University of Illinois. Visit her blog Recipe Renovator.

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