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Purdue Researcher Receives $1.6M Grant For Repurposing Meds

antibiotic resistance

Photo: Steve Burns

Antibiotics are commonly used to treat bacterial infections, but some bacteria are immune to the drugs.

The National Institute of Health has awarded Purdue University Associate Professor Mohamed Seleem a $1.6 million grant to find out whether two FDA-approved drugs can be repurposed to treat life-threatening and drug-resistant bacteria.

Neither of the drugs are antibiotics, which Seleem says is can be key. He says so far, the research has been promising.

“These are not the only two drugs we have,” Seleem says. “We got funding for these two drugs, but we got encouraged and screened other drugs, and we find that other drugs have potential and we’re working on these other drugs.”

Antibiotics are commonly used to treat bacterial infections, but some bacteria are immune to the drugs. Seleem says antibiotics aren’t necessarily a sustainable treatment looking into the future.

“Antibiotics actually require many years to make, they are very expensive to make, and they don’t actually bring in lots of money, so many pharmaceutical companies abandoned the field of making antibiotics,” Seleem says.

The NIH grant is for five years.

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