Give Now

Monroe County’s Food And Beverage Tax Isn’t Impacting Local Businesses As Previously Thought

In addition to restaurants, bars and prepared food at grocery stores, the tax also applies to catering. (James Vavrek WFIU/WTIU)

A food and beverage tax that went into effect earlier this year in Monroe County isn’t hitting some businesses as hard as they expected.

The 1 percent tax on prepared food and drinks started in February. In addition to restaurants, bars and prepared food at grocery stores, the tax also applies to catering.

Some local businesses worried the tax would discourage people from eating out or catering meals.

But Jeff Mease, co-founder of One World Enterprises, says his business has been relatively unaffected.

Mease says he did have to notify customers who ordered before the tax went into effect that they’d have to pay a little more. But, he says that increase has mostly been only a few dollars extra.

“It’s sort of no choice,” he says. “They can’t go to another caterer, and they can not be happy with the local government but I think everybody sees it probably as just one percent.”

Mease says his business could see a bigger impact if the tax increases.

“Now that we have it in place it’s actually easier to say ‘let’s make it 2 percent,’” Mease says.

The money being raised from the levy will help pay for an expansion of the county’s convention center.

Want to contact your legislators about an issue that matters to you? Find out how to contact your senators and member of Congress here.

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media News:

Support For Indiana Public Media Comes From