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‘The Good Catholic’ Creators To Shoot New Film In Bloomington

The company plans to produce six films in Indiana over the next three years.

The creative team behind “The Good Catholic” will begin shooting another film in Bloomington Friday.

Indiana-based Pigasus Pictures plans to produce six films in Indiana over the next three years, beginning with a dark comedy called “Ms. White Light.”

Indiana University graduate Paul Shoulberg is writing and directing the movie. He also wrote and directed “The Good Catholic.”

The film follows a woman capable of removing fear from terminally ill patients, and includes elements of the supernatural. The film will feature Roberta Colindrez in the lead role of Lex Cordova. Zachary Spicer, CEO of Pigasus Pictures and producer for both films, will play what he calls “a psychic with ulterior motives.” Other actors involved in the project include Carson Meyer, John Ortiz and Judith Light.

Spicer, who also played the role of Father Daniel in “The Good Catholic,” says the film industry is concentrated in larger cities like New York and Los Angeles, but Indiana has its own appeal.

“I think it’s important to have a voice and to have a new storytelling entity,” Spicer says. “Not in New York and not in L.A., but actually in the middle of the country, and start getting new conversations going and changing the conversations we’re currently having.”

Spicer also attended IU with Pigasus Pictures COO John Armstrong.

Armstrong, who will co-produce “Ms. White Light” with Spicer, says Indiana is a part of each of the movies they’re creating.

“Indiana is really in our DNA,” Armstrong says. “And so the stories that we tell, although you might see them, they do have universal appeal to other people and other groups, they are infused with the spirit of us and our roots. And our roots are here.”

Armstrong says the six upcoming films will cover a wide range of genres, including indie dramas, comedies and family-based films. He says the films will have a wide appeal.

“Our company’s mission is really to be Indiana’s premier film company,” Armstrong says. “We have three goals: to create jobs, to retain Indiana talent, and to inspire the next generation of young people in Indiana.”

Armstrong says the company is already doing all three of those things.

Pigasus Pictures is working closely with the community to create an infrastructure. On both “The Good Catholic” and “Ms. White Light,” the company has offered internships through The Media School at Indiana University and worked with local businesses for funding.

He says the company also created a statewide screenwriting competition for local high schools called Project Pigasus, which began last year. The winning script was produced into a fully-fledged short film.

A recent proposal to offer tax credits to filmmakers in the state failed to pass. But Spicer thinks his company can prove there’s a future for Indiana’s film industry by creating these films, and providing long-term employment opportunities to Hoosiers.

“So I believe if you build up that infrastructure and people can start to see the possibilities and the economic activity that surrounds film, and how much it affects the community that it’s in, that that just helps continue the conversation,” Spicer says.

Regardless of whether lawmakers decide to provide incentives for filmmakers in Indiana, both Spicer and Armstrong say Pigasus Pictures will continue to create movies in Indiana.

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