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Earth Eats: Real Food, Green Living

Making Kombucha At Home Makes Financial Sense

In today's show, Mother Hubbard's Cupboard gives a kombucha tutorial. Then we meet Amanda LeGore-Smith and hear how Asian carp helped her rebuild her life.

kombucha SCOBY and instructions

The study of what is in our gut, the many millions of helpful microbes and bacteria that aide in digestion, is a fairly new realm of scientific exploration. Nevertheless, the health supplement industry markets microbe-stimulating probiotics as essential to maintaining optimal gut health. Some supplements can cost $30 a bottle, which can break to a dollar a pill. If you want to add probiotics to your diet but don’t want to break the bank, we have some good news.

In this week’s podcast, reporter Aubrey Seader provides an explainer for making kombucha at home.

Barbara Lehr teaches classes on fermented foods at Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard every Friday. Barbara is not a trained nutritionist, doctor or scientist. She offers her knowledge about fermented foods, and teaches students how to make various kinds of fermented and probiotic foods because they have been beneficial to her health personally:

The benefit of adding fermented foods, primarily, is that you are contributing to the health of your gut flora. What kind of encouragement you give them will dictate how robust and healthy you are. A lot of our health begins in our gut.

Also today, where some see Asian carp as a nuisance, Lula Luu sees them as a business opportunity. Fin Gourmet produces high-end food products made from the invasive species. She also saw an opportunity in hiring former addicts and at-risk community members to work in her business:

The Mississippi River is a very long river. It would be an incredible opportunity to replicate (Fin Gourmet). There are a lot of people who could use this sense of hope.

And in the kitchen, another “trash fish” gets the gourmet treatment with Chef Daniel Orr.

Stories On This Episode

Fin Gourmet Gives Asian Carp, Addicts A Second Chance

Fin tackles the problem of invasive species by selling high-end Asian carp products while employing some of their community's most vulnerable members.

Sweet & Spicy Nut Brittle

Time for a treat! Select your favorite nuts for this Caribbean style nut brittle.

Catfish, Shiitakes Party In A Foil Boat

Some people say catfish has a muddy flavor; I prefer to call it earthy. This preparation mutes the catfish flavor with ginger, garlic and sesame oil.

These Voracious Flies Could Limit Food Waste, Feed Chickens

Mad Agriculture takes fly larvae and puts them in bins full of food waste – pulp from a local juice company – and lets them chow down for days.

Resistance To Important Antibiotics Found On U.S. Swine Farm

The CDC had already called carbapenem-resistance an "urgent threat" to human health that is responsible for about 600 deaths a year.

Colorado County Board Votes To Ban GMO Crops On Public Land

The vote puts in place a transition plan to remove GMO corn and sugar beets from public land within the next 5 years.

Annie Corrigan

Annie Corrigan is a producer and announcer for WFIU. In addition to serving as the local voice for NPR's Morning Edition, she produces WFIU's weekly sustainable food program Earth Eats. She earned degrees in oboe performance from Indiana University and Bowling Green State University.

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