Indiana

Education, From The Capitol To The Classroom

Audio

If Indiana Offers Pre-K Vouchers, Who Will Ensure Quality?

A Head Start teacher in South Bend reads to her students.

Elle Moxley / StateImpact Indiana

A Head Start teacher in South Bend reads to her class of 4-year-olds.

Indiana is one of 10 states that doesn’t provide any public money for preschool — but, if elected leaders get their way, that could change soon.

State lawmakers and Gov. Mike Pence say they’ll make pre-K funding a priority in 2014. Pence favors a targeted program for low-income families similar to the Choice Scholarship vouchers the state provides to K-12 students.

But early learning advocates say the success of the initiative will depend largely on how Indiana measures quality.

“Are they going to put in that oversight if they’re giving vouchers? Is that oversight any good?” says Ann Rosen, co-director of the Family Connection, a non-profit that provides teacher assessments to pre-K providers in St. Joseph County.

In the absence of state leadership on early childhood education, it’s been up to community foundations such as Rosen’s to fill the void. Continue Reading

Why Evansville School Leaders Say They Don’t Need State Help To Turn Around A Troubled School

Glenwood Leadership Academy fourth grade teacher Amber Santana leads her students in multiplication drills while pacing across her their desktops. Santana is in her second year at the school.

Kyle Stokes / StateImpact Indiana

Glenwood Leadership Academy fourth grade teacher Amber Santana leads her students in multiplication drills while pacing across their desktops. Santana is in her second year at the school.

Her shoes kicked off, a white board in hand, teacher Amber Santana is leading multiplication drills with her fourth graders at Evansville’s Glenwood Leadership Academy — while standing on their desks.

Standing just outside the third-year teacher’s room, Glenwood principal Tamara Skinner smiles.

“I realize that’s a bit unorthodox,” Skinner says, but Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation leaders say that’s the kind of vitality they hope to see in its staff — vitality that’s key to turning the troubled school around.

Teachers were burning out when Skinner took the principal’s job at Glenwood last school year. The school had a discipline problem. Its student body turns over often as kids from the largely-poor neighborhoods on Evansville’s south side moved from school to school.

With one of Indiana’s worst passing rates on last year’s statewide tests, Glenwood is all but assured its sixth straight F — leaving state officials with a decision to make before this school year is over. Continue Reading

Why Closing A School Won’t Keep Buses Running In Muncie

Supporters of Muncie Southside High School asked the Board of Trustees not to close the school. But district officials concluded the building could not be converted to house students in 7-12 grade.

Elle Moxley / StateImpact Indiana

Supporters of Muncie Southside High School asked the Board of Trustees not to close the school. But district officials concluded the building could not be converted to house students in 7-12 grade. Next year all high schoolers in the district will go to Muncie Central.

The Muncie Community Schools Board of Trustees voted this week to consolidate the city’s two high schools. The merger is expected to save the district $1.7 million annually — but it’s unlikely to solve the district’s transportation problems.

Earlier this month voters rejected a referendum that district officials said would keep school buses running. But buildings and buses are two separate issues.

“Very seldom will you have two initiatives like this at the same time,” says Superintendent Tim Heller, who on Monday recommended the board vote to move all high school students to Central and reopen Southside as a middle school.

Despite the efforts of Southside parents and students, who packed town hall meetings advocating for moving grades 7-12 into the high school buildings, the board voted 4-1 in favor of the plan.

Logistically, Heller says there just wasn’t enough space at Southside to make it work. So next year Southside will house grades 6-8, and the district will close Wilson Middle School.

“I was principal of Muncie South for three years,” says Heller. “I would certainly hate to have to close that school. But by the same token, my goal is to continue to meet the payroll on the 5th and 20th of each month.”

Closing Southside, says Heller, will help make that happen. But it won’t save the district enough to pay for bus service, too. Continue Reading

Why Kentucky Might Provide A Template For What To Do With The Common Core

Ryan Davis starts a new unit in his geometry class at Central High School in Louisville, Ky. Davis has been teaching Common Core since 2011 and says the new standards appropriately narrow the number of topics math teachers are expected to cover.

Elle Moxley / StateImpact Indiana

Ryan Davis starts a new unit in his geometry class at Central High School in Louisville, Ky. Davis has been teaching Common Core since 2011 and says the new standards appropriately narrow the number of topics math teachers are expected to cover.

This spring, as Indiana lawmakers debated whether to leave the Common Core initiative, students in neighboring Kentucky were taking new state tests aligned to the nationally-crafted academic standards.

A total of 45 states adopted the new standards for math and English language arts back in 2010. But every state is on a different timeline for implementing the Common Core. Before lawmakers paused rollout here, only kindergarten and first grade teachers had made the switch. Kentucky’s plan was more aggressive. Two years ago, it became the first state in the country to switch to new assessments.

Jamitra Fulleord says her teachers didn’t talk to students about the Common Core specifically, but they did say the new tests would be harder.

“So when the test comes around, of course we’re all nervous,” says Fulleord, a senior at Central High School in Louisville, Ky. “We’re like oh no, we already have like the ACT and the SAT staring at us in the face, so we’re going to have this really hard test.”

And, says Fulleord, the new test was harder. Across Kentucky, the number of students reaching proficiency fell dramatically when the state started testing the more rigorous standards. But they’re back up slightly now. That’s good news not just for Kentucky education officials, but also for education policy watchers here who are looking for signs of what Indiana will do next. Continue Reading

What Three Education Polls Can Tell Us About Support For The Common Core

Lisa Coughanowr, a kindergarten teacher at East Side Elementary in Brazil, reads aloud to her students. She asks questions about the story to check their understanding.

Elle Moxley / StateImpact Indiana

Lisa Coughanowr, a kindergarten teacher at East Side Elementary in Brazil, reads aloud to her students. She asks questions about the story to check their understanding.

If you’ve heard of the Common Core State Standards, you’re in the minority.

The trio of education polls we wrote about last week show only 38 percent of Americans can identify the new, nationally-crafted academic standards adopted by 45 states, including Indiana (we know regular StateImpact readers are among that enlightened third).

Jay Kenworthy is spokesman for Stand For Children, a pro-Common Core advocacy group that’s been active in statehouse conversations about the Common Core.

“This was a national poll,” Kenworthy told WFIU’s Will Bray. “In Indiana, the polling has shown that Hoosiers are more aware generally than their national counterparts because it’s been such a hot-button topic.”

Before last week, the last reliable numbers we had on the Common Core came from a Bellwether Research poll commissioned by Howey Politics Indiana. Those numbers, out in April, showed a slight majority of Hoosiers favored staying the course with Common Core. Continue Reading

Video: Explaining The Change That Lifted 165 Indiana Schools’ A-F Grades

StateImpact Indiana / YouTube

How did former state superintendent Tony Bennett lift not only Christel House Academy’s state A-F grade, but more than 160 Indiana schools’ performance ratings as well? We explain the ‘subscore ceiling,’ and how lifting that ceiling impacted many schools’ grades.

UPDATED, September 6: Below, we’ve added audio from a companion radio piece we sent statewide this week. More on the developments in the story here.

Indianapolis charter school Christel House Academy was not the only beneficiary of former state superintendent Tony Bennett’s last-minute changes to the A-F grading formula, as we wrote last week.

With the help of our two favorite storytelling mainstays — white board markers and YouTube — we wanted to illustrate the change that increased 165 schools’ final A-F ratings in 2012. The result? This video. Continue Reading

How Tony Bennett's Last-Minute A-F Changes Lifted 165 Indiana School Grades

Click here to view a map of 165 schools whose grades improved because of a last-minute change former state superintendent Tony Bennett's staff made to Indiana's A-F grading system.

Kyle Stokes / StateImpact Indiana

Click here to view a map of 165 schools whose grades improved because of a change former state superintendent Tony Bennett's staff made to Indiana's A-F grading system.

Though it’s received the most media attention in the controversy that led to ex-Indiana schools chief Tony Bennett’s resignation, Christel House Academy was not the only school to benefit from state officials’ changes to Indiana’s fledgling school grading system in 2012.

After studying last year’s A-F rating data, a StateImpact analysis has identified 165 schools across the state — including Christel House — that saw higher final grades than they would have if Bennett’s staff hadn’t tweaked the formula roughly six weeks before releasing 2012′s results.

Take a look at this map and search this table to see if your school is one of those 165.

Bennett’s staff does not directly mention the change in emails the Associated Press published this month. From those messages, it’s not apparent state officials made the change with Christel House alone in mind.

The finding does, however, show how a relatively minor alteration to the A-F grading scale can have statewide implications. Continue Reading

What's The Lesson Of The Bennett Emails For States That Issue A-F Grades?

State superintendent Tony Bennett announces results of Indiana's IREAD-3 exam in his office at the statehouse Tuesday morning.

Kyle Stokes / StateImpact Indiana

Former Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Bennett has stepped down as Florida Education Commissioner after the Associated Press released emails indicated his staff changed the letter grades of more than a dozen schools.

A pair of independent evaluators will assess the accuracy of letter grades schools received from the state in 2012.

The announcement came the day after former state superintendent Tony Bennett resigned his post as Florida Education Commissioner following the release of emails showing his staff changed the letter grades for more than a dozen charter schools during his time in Indiana.

In a statement, Gov. Mike Pence said the independent review is necessary to ensure the integrity of the school grading system the state started using last year. Restoring public confidence in the system, he added, is the first step in a scheduled rewrite of the A-F accountability metrics already underway.

An increasing number of states are using letter grades to rate schools because they’re easy for parents — and taxpayers — to understand.

“There is a very clear tradeoff here,” says Mike Petrilli, vice president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. “The downside is you lose a lot of nuance.” Continue Reading

Question In Daniels Email Dustup: Who Decides What Students Read In Class?

Mitch Daniels takes questions from media from the stage of Purdue's Loeb Playhouse following the announcement he would become the school's next president.

Elle Moxley / StateImpact Indiana

Mitch Daniels takes questions from media from the stage of Purdue's Loeb Playhouse following the announcement he would become the school's next president.

When the Purdue Board of Trustees selected Mitch Daniels last year as the university’s next president, he pledged not to let his politics interfere with his new role.

But Daniels’ recent defense of disparaging remarks he made about a controversial historian while governor has some Purdue faculty members questioning that commitment.

“I hope to be the strongest advocate Purdue has ever had for the freedom to speak out,” Daniels said at a press conference after the Associated Press released emails he wrote criticizing historian Howard Zinn. “That does not mean that the product of scholarly work should be free from criticism.”

Still, Daniels reiterated his position that Zinn’s work should not be taught to K-12 students.

Then, on Monday, 90 Purdue professors signed an open letter to Daniels, writing they were “troubled” by Daniels’ continued criticism of the historian. Continue Reading

The Surprising Story Of Wyoming's Troubled Online Tests — And What Indiana Can Learn From It

Grant Teton National Park in Western Wyoming.

George Frey / Landov

Grant Teton National Park in Western Wyoming.

The story of Wyoming’s first foray into online standardized testing is part cautionary tale, part hope-filled parable.

In 2010, the first year Wyoming gave its entire standardized test online, students across the state reported the testing website had rejected their login or crashed mid-test — much like with this year’s ill-fated ISTEP+ exam.

But as an outside review of the scores later showed, none of the interruptions impacted scores on the Proficiency for Wyoming Students, or “PAWS,” exam.

In fact, Wyoming’s test scores went up across the board that year — despite the fears of state education officials, who asked the federal government months before getting the results to throw out the 2010 data.

It’s a possible best-case-scenario for Indiana educators, who fear their own evaluations or their schools’ letter grades hang on the results of a validity study of this year’s disrupted ISTEP+ exam that’s due out sometime soon. Continue Reading

About StateImpact

StateImpact seeks to inform and engage local communities with broadcast and online news focused on how state government decisions affect your lives.
Learn More »

Economy
Education