Indiana

Education, From The Capitol To The Classroom

Lauren Chapman

Lauren is a Ball State University graduate and previously worked in magazines, newspapers and commercial television. The Indianapolis native has two cats, Belle and Elvis.

IPS Superintendent Ferebee Gets $28K Bonus, Salary Increase

UPDATE:

Indianapolis Public Schools Board approved a $28,000 performance-based bonus for Superintendent Lewis Ferebee at Thursday’s board meeting.

The additional pay is based on an annual review of Ferebee’s performance by the IPS Board. The school commissioners unanimously approved giving Ferebee 80 percent of a possible $35,000 of performance-based pay for meeting 11 predetermined goals in 2016-2017 school year.


Indianapolis Public Schools Board is proposing a $28,000 bonus for Superintendent Lewis Ferebee. The board will vote on the payout at Thursday’s school board meeting. The bonus is based on an annual review of Ferebee’s performance by the IPS Board.

Read more at: www.wfyi.org

Ball State Buys Muncie Middle School

But that doesn’t mean Northside will close immediately – or even next school year – as an active Muncie Community Schools middle school. According to the agreement, MCS is allowed to lease the property back from Ball State for one dollar per year for the next five years.

The plan matches one passed by the MCS school board in April. While voting to close school buildings to combat the district’s multi-million dollar deficit, board member Robert Warrner proposed to keep Northside open in its current location, until a new building could be built on the site of the now-closed Storer Elementary School.


Ball State University officials say the school will buy Northside Middle School from Muncie Community Schools. IPR’s Stephanie Wiechmann reports. Ball State University spokeswoman Kathy Wolfe says the university will pay $1.27 million for the building, which first opened as a high school in

Read more at: indianapublicradio.org

Hoosier Boy Who Lost Dad To Overdose Teaches Others To Avoid Drugs

“Some days I feel bad, some days I feel sad, It’s just a roller coaster of emotions.”

Twelve-year-old Avery Elmore lost his dad to a heroin overdose in May of this year.

“It has been five months but it doesn’t even feel that long,” Elmore says. “I wanted to go to the drug dealers and confront them but my mom said that wasn’t OK. The only way I can get it out is by speaking.”


A Hoosier boy who lost a parent to a drug overdose is turning his negative experience into a positive learning experience for other Indiana residents. As IPR’s Britney Ermon reports, he spoke in Anderson this weekend to teach people more about the opioid public health crisis. “Some days I fe

Read more at: indianapublicradio.org

DeVos Speaks At National FFA Convention In Indianapolis

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos spoke to thousands of students from across the country Friday at Bankers Life Fieldhouse for the 2017 National FFA Convention.

During her speech, DeVos discussed the future of agriculture and her hopes to inspire students to achieve their education through multiple avenues.


Photo: James Vavrek U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos spoke to thousands of students from across the country Friday at Bankers Life Fieldhouse for the 2017 National FFA Convention. During her speech, DeVos discussed the future of agriculture and her hopes to inspire students to achieve their education through multiple avenues.

Read more at: indianapublicmedia.org

So, Who Are You?

We want to get to know you, our audience.

In the last few months, StateImpact has gone through some changes in how often we’re sharing stories on social media, and how much we’re posting on the site.

But as we continue to adapt to some of these new changes, we want to make sure you, our readers and audience, still care about what we’re publishing here.

What will this be used for? Exclusively, the responses will be used to inform our social media strategy and what stories we share from our statewide partners.

Thank you for your responses!

Brown County Schools ‘Get Real’ About Addiction After Overdose Deaths

Barb Foley’s son Kyle, a graduate of the school district, died from an overdose in July.

“Meth and heroin are killers,” Foley tells the students. “Don’t think you can just try them one time walk away from it. Heroin stole my son’s last breath. It left a big hole inside of me. A big part of me is gone that can never be replaced.”

Samantha Taylor, formerly addicted to drugs, dropped out of high school when she was in 10th grade. She shared her story and didn’t hold back.

“I started doing heroin at 16, and it just went on from there,” Taylor says.

In the last few months, two Brown County High School graduates have overdosed and died. Superintendent Laura Hammack says it sent shock waves through the community and the hallways where the students walk to and from class.

“It’s surreal to go to those funerals, to see pictures of these students who lived such vibrant lives and now are lost,” Hammack says.


Brown County High School students are packed into the school auditorium. The freshmen and sophomores listen as three community members bluntly share how drugs have impacted their lives. Barb Foley’s son Kyle, a graduate of the school district, died from an overdose in July. “Meth and heroin are killers,” Foley tells the students.

Read more at: indianapublicmedia.org

Teens Working Part-Time Jobs Down Significantly Since 1970s

The number of teens working a part-time job has dropped significantly since the late 1990s. Education experts say a part-time job can give students a competitive edge when it comes to college admissions, but they’re also expected to volunteer, participate in clubs, and more, all while keeping their grades up.


There’s no wasted space in Nicole Klee’s locker. Klee is a junior at Franklin Central High school. “This is my AP chem binder,” she says. “It doesn’t fully fit because it’s too big.” Klee has a full schedule. She’s a soccer player, participates in student council, and takes several advanced classes.

Read more at: indianapublicmedia.org

Muncie Schools Managers: Staff Cuts Will Continue

Standing in front of the Distressed Unit Appeals Board in Indianapolis, Administrator Assistance founder Steve Wittenauer praised the administration at Muncie Community Schools for already making some significant cuts to staffing. But he says that will have to continue.

“They did a lot of the heavy lifting. We’re probably to the point now where it’s going to become more painful because staffing reductions are still in order,” Wittenauer says. “But they were very, very successful in their staffing reductions. And certainly closing those three buildings had an impact.”


Muncie Community Schools’ emergency management team has told a state board that more staff will need to be cut at the district. As IPR’s Stephanie Wiechmann reports, MCS is still trying to find enough money to pay bills through the end of the year.

Read more at: indianapublicradio.org

Carmel Clay Superintendent Placed On Leave Pending Review

“The board is undertaking a thorough review of its district leadership and believes that its action today will enable it to complete this review more quickly and in a manner that respects the confidentiality of its employees’ personnel matters,” Spanenberg said at the start of a work session at the district office. “Because of these confidentiality concerns, the board will not make further comment on this until it has finished its review.”


Carmel Clay Schools Superintendent Nicholas Wahl was placed on administrative leave Monday following an executive meeting of the school board. Board President Layla Spanenberg declined to offer reasons behind the board’s decision.

Read more at: www.wfyi.org

Burris Laboratory School 50th Reunion Class Gives Back To Soup Kitchen

The Soup Kitchen’s executive director is also a member of the Burris class. Loretta Parsons says she is grateful her class is raising money for the community they were raised in.

“To pick this that I am involved in is so dear to me. It just was really humbling and I’m just so appreciative of the effort they are making.”

Thirteen classmates also volunteered at the soup kitchen while they were in Muncie for the weekend, before dining at the reunion.


A Burris Laboratory School class celebrating their 50th reunion this weekend in Muncie wanted to give back to the city that educated them. As IPR’s Alexis Alicea reports, they chose a cause that is close to home for a fellow classmate.

Read more at: indianapublicradio.org

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