Indiana

Education, From The Capitol To The Classroom

Education Roundtable To Vet Proposed Academic Standards Monday

Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz, left, and Gov. Mike Pence co-chair the Education Roundtable. The group must sign off on proposed standards before a State Board vote.

Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz, left, and Gov. Mike Pence co-chair the Education Roundtable. The group must sign off on proposed standards before a State Board vote.

The Education Roundtable will vote Monday on proposed academic standards to replace the Common Core in Indiana.

It will be the last chance to change the standards before an up-down vote at the State Board of Education meeting April 28.

Gov. Mike Pence and state superintendent Glenda Ritz co-chair the panel of education, community and business leaders who must sign off on the proposed standards. If they suggest any changes, the standards will have to go back to the teams of Hoosier educators who have been working on the rewrite for the past six months.

“Those changes would then need to go back to the college- and career-ready panel to determine any changes that are college and career ready,” says Center for Education and Career Innovation spokeswoman Lou Ann Baker. “And from then, that final product would go straight to the Board of Education.”

Baker says that process can happen in the week before the State Board is scheduled to meet.

An anti-Common Core group plans to rally at the statehouse Monday in opposition to the proposed standards. They want the state to return to its previous expectations for students.

“Returning to our former standards, which were judged superior, provides an easy transition for students and teachers to begin planning for the next school year,” Hoosiers Against Common Core co-founder Heather Crossin said in a statement.

But the 2006 English language arts standards and 2000 math standards Indiana used prior to Common Core adoption would be unlikely to satisfy a federal agreement to set expectations that will prepare more students for college and jobs.

The state has until July 1 to select new standards.

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