Indiana

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Critics Say Proposed Academic Standards Overlap Too Much With Common Core

Teacher Dylan Purlee tells state education officials Indiana should continue to share standards with the states that have adopted Common Core.

Elle Moxley / StateImpact Indiana

Teacher Dylan Purlee tells state education officials Indiana should continue to share standards with the states that have adopted Common Core.

At a public meeting in Sellersburg Monday, critics of Common Core told state education officials the draft standards Hoosier educators have proposed are too similar to satisfy their concerns with the nationally-crafted expectations.

“We feel cheated. We feel lied to,” says parent Emily Camenisch, adding that she thinks the process to rewrite standards was rushed.

Other parents pointed to standards in the draft taken word-for-word from the Common Core.

But State Board of Education member Brad Oliver says some overlap is to be expected.

“If again you go back and start from the premise that college- and career-readiness is about making sure students have requisite skills and knowledge prior to being able to go to college without being remediated or go into a career, you apply that uniformly to whatever standards they looked at, you’re going to see a certain percentage of the standards come through,” says Oliver.

Oliver says he’s hoping more feedback on specific standards will come in at the next two public meetings — tomorrow in Indianapolis and Wednesday in Plymouth — as well as online. Less than 20 people signed up to comment Monday.

“What I’m still waiting to hear is actual specifics on particular standards at grades K-1 in math and other areas where I keep hearing concerns about how the standards are worded or structured,” says Oliver. “I’d like to hear more about that from folks that are concerned.”

But the standards did get some praise from educators who’ve been implementing Common Core in their classrooms since the state adopted the standards in 2010. Teacher Dylan Purlee told state education officials pausing rollout hasn’t been good for Indiana schools.

“Who has been left behind?” Purlee asked, adding that given the commonalities between the proposed draft standards and the Common Core, Indiana would be better off sticking with the other 45 states that have agreed to share standards.

Follow @ellemoxley for updates from Tuesday’s meeting in Indianapolis.

Comments

  • Lee Barrios

    Our state (Louisiana) paid WestEd to provide a “Crosswalk” between our previous state standards and GLEs and the Common Core. The document clearly showed what was added, what was deleted and what stayed the same. Has anyone filed a Public Information Request to see if such a document is available in your state? If, in fact, a Crosswalk was not commissioned before Indiana adopted Common Core, it shows a huge lack of expertise in the field of standards development on the part of those who adopted the CCSS and also an obvious lack of concern for the quality of the CCSS or the claims that it is more “rigorous.”

    • http://www.killcommoncore.com/ killcommoncore

      Lee, it might help if you provide a link to the Crosswalk. Maybe. This agenda is so hard to fight.
      But Fight we Must!

    • Elle Moxley

      Lee — I know Indiana did a crosswalk between the state’s previous academic standards and the Common Core when the new standards were first adopted. I’ve asked state education officials if there’s a way to get this so it’s accessible.

  • http://www.killcommoncore.com/ killcommoncore

    “Who has been left behind?” Purlee asked, adding that given the commonalities between the proposed draft standards and the Common Core, Indiana would be better off sticking with the other 45 states that have agreed to share standards.
    Riiiiight, if you see all the other lemmings jumping off the cliff, then it MUST be the thing to do!

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