Indiana

Education, From The Capitol To The Classroom

Progress Report 2013: Read, Download & Listen To Our Special Report On The Common Core In Indiana

Our half-hour special on the Common Core is airing on statewide public radio this week. Click on the image below to listen the audio and read its online companion piece here:

Click here to view Progress Report 2013, StateImpact Indiana's in-depth look at the Common Core debate.

Click here to view Progress Report 2013, StateImpact Indiana's in-depth look at the Common Core debate.

Download the full audio of the half-hour radio special here.

Comments

  • Cindie Hilliard

    The problem with Common Core is that it totally disregards the individual strengths and weaknesses of students. Math and science will be pushed to the detriment of language and writing skills, music and art. It leaves almost zero room for critical thinking and informative decision making – it is all about the test scores. Teach them to pass the tests…thinking and reasoning NOT required.

    • Barbara Warrum

      When I was in school, many years ago, we were expected to regurgitate
      information. Critical thinking was certainly not taught, encouraged, and
      maybe not even allowed.

      I had one priceless teacher who told us he
      didn’t really care if we memorized dates of wars, he wanted us to be
      able to argue with him and each other, to debate the causes and
      ramifications of wars and events. He said if we had one original thought
      while in his class, then he had taught us everything we needed to know.

      I can honestly say I learned more science, history, and logic in his
      class than in the other 5 classes combined that year. I still have a
      copy of his death notice tucked into the front page of his favorite book
      “The Story of Civilization” by Will and Ariel Durant. I’m sure B.C. Smith is arguing history in heaven at this moment

  • Erin Tuttle

    I’m surprised that teachers who support Common Core are afraid that their kids won’t be able to pass the IStep after teaching Common Core standards. If they are so rigorous, what’s the problem?

    Has the US Dept. of Ed said they wouldn’t recognize our old standards as college ready? Even Fordham rated our 2009 math and ELA standards as better than Common Core. If our old state’s standards weren’t college ready, CC is certainly not. If education policy members can’t understand that, they should resign. Besides, who gave the feds the power to tell us what standards we should have? That’s a violation of federal law.

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