Poets Weave

“Crimes Against The Lyric” By James Tate

This week, James Tate's poems "Crimes Against the Lyric," "No Spitting Up," "Anatomy," and "Peggy in the Twilight" from the book Distance from Loved Ones.

james tate 1 sunset orginal

Photo: Dom0803

"Speaking of sunsets, last night's was shocking. I mean, sunsets aren't supposed to frighten you, are they? Well this one was terrifying. People were screaming in the streets..." -James Tate, from his poem "Never Again the Same."

Born in Kansas City, Missouri in 1943, James Tate‘s first book, The Lost Pilot, won the Yale Series of Younger Poets in 1967. Going on to publish over thirteen books of poetry, as well as short stories and essays, Tate has become one of the most beloved contemporary American poets. His Selected Poems won the 1992 Pulitzer Prize, and his most recent book, The Ghost Soldiers, was published by Ecco Press in 2008.

On this edition of The Poets Weave, I’m reading poems from Distance from Loved Ones, by James Tate, published in 1990 by Wesleyan University Press.

Stay Connected

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from The Poets Weave:

Support For Indiana Public Media Comes From

About The Poets Weave

Search The Poets Weave

WFIU is on Twitter