State’s Final Campaign Spending Disclosures Incomplete

The Secretary of State's office did not have any records of State Representative Matt Ubelhor's campaign spending, among others.

money

Photo: 401K 2012 (Flickr)

Nearly $100,000 was on the wrong side of the ledger.

The Indiana Secretary of State’s Office has posted the final round of financial disclosures for candidates running in next week’s election. But as candidates look to see what various warchests hold, some information is still incomplete.

Until a couple days ago, State Representative Matt Ubelhor’s page showed he had not spent a dime on his re-election bid.

“It was far more than interesting – certainly it looked totally off-kilter.”

Ubelhor says the nearly $100,000 the Secretary of State’s site showed in his account should have appeared on the other side of the ledger – as money he’s spent on yard signs, media spots and other campaign expenses.

He says he had to file an amendment to his final financial statement, in part because his new campaign finance manager did not know some of the procedures the state requires for disclosing donations and expenditures.

“I don’t know that it’s anybody’s fault.  I sure wouldn’t blame the election division nor anyone that’s out there trying to get that done because it is somewhat confusing.”

What’s more, Ubelhor’s opponent, Jeff Sparks, says he was not watching the site to learn what his opponent had banked, because he knew he’d be outspent.

“We didn’t care what he spent,” Sparks says. “We worked from our side.  We weren’t going to match it, so it really didn’t matter to us.”

And, as Sparks predicted, the incumbent Republican has outraised him by a factor of more than five-to-one.

Stan Jastrzebski

WFIU/WTIU News Senior Editor Stan Jastrzebski spent time as a reporter with WGN Radio in Chicago and as an editor at Network Indiana, an Indianapolis news service. Stan is the winner of awards from the Associated Press, the RTDNA, the Indiana Broadcasters Association and the Society of Professional Journalists. He hosts WFIU's Ask the Mayor and anchors WTIU's InFocus.

View all posts by this author »

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media News:

Support For Indiana Public Media Comes From

Search News

Stay Connected

RSS e-mail itunes Facebook Twitter Flickr YouTube

Follow us on Twitter

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media News:

Recent Politics Stories

Recent Videos

Find Us on Facebook