Settlement Reached In BP Tar Sands Controversy

A settlement has been signed that will cut emissions from the highly-polluting tar sands oil project in Northwest Indiana.

Tar Sands

Photo: Michael Kalus(Flickr)

A tar sands' mine in Fort Mcmurray, Alberta, Canada. Trucks bring the petroleum rich sand to a refinery, where the oil is separated from other materials.

The controversy over state air pollution permits to expand British Petroleum’s refinery in Whiting, Indiana is coming to an end. A precedent-setting settlement has been signed that will cut emissions from the highly-polluting tar sands oil project and provide stronger air quality protections for Northwest Indiana residents.

State and federal agencies and several environmental and community groups claim BP’s air permits did not accurately reflect the pollution realities of the Whiting refinery’s expansion.

The settlement calls for $400-million in added pollution control and monitoring equipment to deal with increased emissions associated with BP‘s shift to tar sands oil.

It also puts in place air monitors that will help with a better understanding of emissions from refineries that process heavy crude oil.

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