MCHA Officials Rescue Over 70 Dogs From Greene County Home

The Monroe County Humane Association is working to rehabilitate and place more than 70 dogs rescued this week from a home in Greene County.

  • Two light brown puppies are in a cage.  One is eating the other is looking at the camera.

    Image 1 of 13

    Photo: Arianna Prothero/WFIU

    The Monroe County Humane Association is working to rehabilitate and place more than 70 dogs rescued this week from a home in Greene County.

  • Cages of dogs

    Image 2 of 13

    Photo: Arianna Prothero

    Many of the dogs were kept in a trailer that had been partitioned into cages with chain-link fencing.

  • A white German Shephard puppy sits to the side of his cage.

    Image 3 of 13

    Photo: Arianna Prothero

    The dogs are now housed in a temporary shelter at the City of Bloomington’s Police and Fire training center.

  • A close up on the face of a black and tan puppy with floppy ears.  The puppy is sleeping with its head between its paws.

    Image 4 of 13

    Photo: Arianna Prothero/WFIU

    One of the rescued puppies sleeps in its temporary home at the City of Bloomington's Police and Fire Training Center.

  • A dark brown pug-mix lays with his head between his paws looking out of the cage with his one good eye.  Shelter workers believe the other eye had been lost to a gun shot wound.

    Image 5 of 13

    Photo: Arianna Prothero

    An MCHA volunteer speculated that this dog's left eye had been lost to a gun shot wound. However, most dogs collected from the Greene County home suffer primarily from fleas and intestinal parasites.

  • A volunteer wearing a pink shirt holds a very small, light brown puppy to her chest.

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    Photo: Arianna Prothero/WFIU

    An MCHA volunteer holds one of rescued puppies to her chest. MCHA CEO Sarah Hayes says more puppies are on their way to the temporary shelter.

  • A close up of a very small, black and tan beagle-mix puppy being wiped down by a MCHA volunteer.

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    Photo: Arianna Prothero/WFIU

    A volunteer wiped down a puppy as a way of getting rid of fleas. MCHA CEO Sarah Hayes said the dogs are now getting proper veterinary care.

  • A female volunteer in a green shirt stands between two rows of cages.

    Image 8 of 13

    Photo: Arianna Prothero/WFIU

    Volunteers from various animal welfare organizations are helping to take care of the confiscated animals.

  • A female volunteer reaches into a cage to pet a white Germand Shephard puppy.

    Image 9 of 13

    Photo: Arianna Prothero/WFIU

    A volunteer reaches into a cage and calms a nervous puppy. Many of the dogs will be transferred to other animal shelters both in and outside Indiana.

  • Web pic large black and tan dog in cage

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    Photo: Arianna Prothero/WFIU

    A large dog sits in his temporary cage. According to Hayes, part of the issue is that animal ordinances are made county by county with no statewide laws in place to provide continuity. Hayes said a state law would be helpful but worried it would not garner enough local support.

  • A mother beagle lays in her cage with her two puppies.

    Image 11 of 13

    Photo: Arianna Prothero/WFIU

    Hayes said the residence in Green County does not appear to qualify as a puppy mill and therefore does not fall under the purview of recent puppy mill legislation.

  • A female volunteer holds a small black and tan puppy.

    Image 12 of 13

    Photo: Arianna Prothero/WFIU

    Sarah Hayes explained this situation is a classic example of what is called “mission-driven hoarding” where hoarding tendencies are fueled by a strong drive to rescue animals.

  • A close up of the small, black and tan puppy being held by a volunteer.

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    Photo: Arianna Prothero/WFIU

    Hayes said such hoarding tendencies are worsened by the environment in Greene County where there are few animal ordinances and a small, overwhelmed humane society.

The Monroe County Humane Association is working to rehabilitate and place more than 70 dogs rescued this week from a home in Greene County.

On Tuesday, after receiving an anonymous tip, the MCHA along with the Indiana State Police, the Green County Health Department, and various other animal welfare organizations removed the dogs from Green County.

Many of the dogs were kept in a trailer that had been partitioned into cages with chain-link fencing.  The dogs are now housed in a temporary shelter at the City of Bloomington’s Police and Fire Training Center.

MCHA  CEO Sarah Hayes explained this situation is a classic example of what is called “mission-driven hoarding,” where hoarding tendencies are fueled by a strong drive to rescue animals.

Hayes said such tendencies are worsened by the environment in Greene County where there are few animal ordinances and a small, overwhelmed humane society.

“So, animals running free, not spayed and neutered, there is no limit on how many animals you can have in your home or elsewhere,” Hayes said.  “It is a really tough situation over there because nothing can be done. Usually it has to get to this level of bad before something can be done.”

According to Hayes, part of the issue is that animal ordinances are made county by county with no statewide laws in place to provide continuity.  Hayes said a state law would be helpful but worried it would not garner enough local support.

“It also comes to enforcement.  And so if you have a state law, you need people in those communities to enforce it and if there is an unwillingness, no interest, or not enough resources, it is not going to happen.”

Hayes said the residence in Green County does not appear to qualify as a puppy mill and therefore does not fall under the purview of recent puppy mill legislation.  Hayes said the dogs are now getting proper veterinary care and many will be transferred to other animal shelters both in and outside Indiana.

Arianna Prothero

Arianna Prothero started at WFIU as a reporter in May of 2008. She is now the Interim Assistant Radio News Director and, along with her reporting duties, produces WFIU’s Noon Edition and anchors All Things Considered on Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. Arianna holds her bachelor’s degree from Indiana University in Political Science with a minor in Russian and Eastern European Studies.

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