Legislature To Amend Smoking Ban And Police Entry Bills

The General Assembly is taking up the bills that would change the laws on police entry into homes without a warrant and a possible statewide smoking ban.

police cars

Photo: Steve Baker (Flickr)

Opponents of the police entry bill say it would allow law enforcement too much unwarranted access. Proponents say it is necessary in certain situations.

Two of the biggest bills remaining in the General Assembly this session are poised for makeovers Tuesday.

A House committee last week amended a bill allowing people to resist police entry. The bill’s sponsor, Representative Jud McMillin, says more changes could be on the way. McMillin has been working with law enforcement on the legislation and the Brookville Republican says he will offer an amendment he hopes will ease concerns in the law enforcement community.

“It says the ability to use deadly force against a law enforcement officer is not appropriate in a lot of situations, so it limits the opportunity for folks to do something like that,” he says.

Another amendment to the bill reinstates a list of specific circumstances in which people do not have a right to resist police entry. The list was taken out in committee.

The Senate also held off action on the statewide smoking ban bill Monday. Lafayette Republican Ron Alting says there are a number of amendments on the bill, including one limiting the exemptions in the bill to only casinos.

“If that doesn’t pass, I will say this, I think then you’re going to see a floodgate of exceptions like the bars and the fraternal order clubs,” Alting says.

In the current bill, bars are only exempted for the first 18 months. And social clubs who admit those at least 18 years of age must vote on whether to allow smoking.

 

Brandon Smith, IPBS

Brandon Smith, IPBS has previously worked as a reporter and anchor for KBIA Radio in Columbia, MO, and at WSPY Radio in Plano, IL as a show host, reporter, producer and anchor. Brandon graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a Bachelor of Journalism in 2010, with minors in political science and history. He was born and raised in Chicago.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/marlene.bakken Marlene Bakken

    Isn’t it something that we have to beg our own government for our Constitutionally protected private property rights? This would be unheard of before our officials allowed pharma money to dictate law. Legislators are scored based on the anti tobacco bills they introduce, support & pass. Their scores are tallied at the end of session and their campaign contributions from the anti’s are based on their score.  I was under the assumption that bribery was illegal!  Bribery:  “The offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting of something of value for the purpose of influencing the action of an official in the discharge of his or her public or legal duties.”
     IT’S NOT ABOUT SMOKING! If you invite others into your home, where you pay the mortgage, the bills and the taxes, you get to make the rules. If you own a business and you pay the mortgage, the bills and the taxes, and you INVITE others in, you should have the same rights as you do in your home! The public is not paying for anything, they can enter or not! 

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