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HJR-3 Opponents Claim Victory, Supporters Not Daunted

The Senate plans to vote on the proposed marriage amendment Monday, but it will not be sent to the voters this year.

HJR3 Supporters

Photo: Brandon Smith/IPBS

A group of HJR-3 supporters hold signs in favor of traditional marriage at the Indiana statehouse.

Opponents of HJR-3 are claiming almost total victory in the wake of the Senate’s decision to quash a revival of the measure’s controversial second sentence.

The House removed HJR-3’s second sentence, which bans civil unions, after concerns were raised the language could prohibit domestic partnership benefits.

Despite calls from HJR-3 proponents and Governor Mike Pence for the Senate to reinsert the sentence, the Senate Republican caucus chose not to offer any changes to the measure on the Senate floor.

Leaving out the second sentence means HJR-3 will have to be approved by the General Assembly in the next two years to make it on the ballot in 2016.

But Freedom Indiana campaign manager Megan Robertson says she thinks the issue’s time has come and gone.

“I personally think that they don’t want to bring this up again,” Robertson said. “They don’t want to have this in the legislative body again, having all the people there and all the constituent contact that our campaign was able to generate.”

But Shane Weist, one of the leaders of Young Hoosiers for Marriage, a grassroots organization backing HJR-3, says his group in this fight for the long haul.

“We feel like this is just the beginning of this, throughout America,” Weist. “I mean, now starts the test. I think this is an issue that’s going to go on for years.”

The Senate is expected to vote on HJR-3 Monday.

It must pass to be sent to the General Assembly for passage again in 2015 or 2016.

Brandon Smith

Brandon Smith has previously worked as a reporter and anchor for KBIA Radio in Columbia, MO, and at WSPY Radio in Plano, IL as a show host, reporter, producer and anchor. Brandon graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a Bachelor of Journalism in 2010, with minors in political science and history. He was born and raised in Chicago.

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