David Camm Speaking Out Against Wrongful Convictions

David Camm, a former Indiana state trooper, was convicted twice of killing his family, but later acquitted. He spoke to ISU criminology students Wednesday.

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    Photo: Jimmy Jenkins

    David Camm speaks to an ISU class on Wednesday, April 23, 2014.

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    Photo: Jimmy Jenkins

    David Camm (left) was twice convicted of killing his wife and two kids before he was acquitted during a third trial.

A former state trooper twice convicted of killing his family before being acquitted at a third trial is speaking out publicly about the case for the first time.

David Camm spoke to an Indiana State University Criminology class Wednesday during a talk on wrongful convictions.

A jury convicted Camm of fatally shooting his wife and two children two separate times. It was overturned both times though on appeal.

Camm says ISU students then analyzed and called into question the initial results of blood splatter evidence, which was key to the prosecution of the case.

“In fact they replicated an experiment – exactly what I had wanted to do for years, but couldn’t because I was incarcerated,” Camm said.

Camm says when the prosecution was confronted with that analysis, their blood spatter expert changed his story, which then led to an acquittal.

He was found not guilty during a third trial last October.

ISU criminology professor Mark Hamm says Camm’s case isn’t unique.

“You know the criminal justice system is not flawless,” Hamm said. “There are many innocent men and women sitting in our prisons across the country.”

Camm is now working to help establish a group called Investigating Innocence to help hire investigators and cover legal fees for people who say they’ve been wrongfully convicted.

“It was like being Rip Van Winkle when you wake up – there was cell phones, laptops, atm machines, different types of gas pumps – I mean all of this was foreign to me,” says Randy Steidl, another speaker at the ISU event.

He spent 12 years on death row in Illinois for the 1986 murders of a couple in Paris, Illinois.

Steidl maintained he had not received proper legal counsel and maintained his innocence. He was released in 2004 upon review of his case by a U.S. District Judge and later awarded $6 million from the state of Illinois.

Jimmy Jenkins

Jimmy Jenkins is a multimedia journalist for WFIU and WTIU news. A native of Terre Haute, he is a masters student at the Indiana University School of Journalism and is proud to be a part of the public broadcasting stations he listened to and watched since he was a child. Follow him on Twitter @newsjunkyjimmy.

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  • chunt

    I don’t have an opinion on his guilt or innocence. But he didn’t have “clean hands” going in it. While he is out on the streets, I do feel he was involved.

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