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Compare The Rival Road Funding Proposals At The Statehouse

This legislative session, both House Republicans and House Democrats have proposed a plan to pay for the next four years of road and bridge maintenance.

This legislative session, both the House Republicans and the House Democrats have proposed a plan to pay for the next four years of road and bridge maintenance.

Photo: Steve Burns

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have proposed road funding legislation.

Finding the funds for infrastructure maintenance has been a contentious issue at the Statehouse for the past few years, with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle offering opposing plans to raise funds.

This legislative session, both the House Republicans and the House Democrats have proposed a plan to pay for the next four years of road and bridge maintenance.

So how do the plans compare?

Over the next four years, the Republican plan estimates more funding for roads than the Democrats’ plan.

Both plans convert existing fuel sales tax to roads, reverting it from the general fund effective immediately. After that, the plans differ.

House Republicans

Republicans propose increasing fuel taxes by 10 cents, a move that has garnered them harsh criticism from groups they usually work closely with, like Americans for Prosperity-Indiana, a fiscally conservative group.

The plan also includes a $15 fee for all yearly vehicle registrations, and a yearly $150 supplemental registration fee for electric vehicles.

The measure also opens the possibility for tolling interstate highways, although GOP leaders are divided on the issue.

Key points:

  • Use fuel sales tax revenue for roads instead of general fund
  • Increase fuel taxes by 10 cents
  • Yearly $15 fee for all vehicles
  • Yearly $150 fee for electric vehicles

House Democrats

The Democrats propose pulling funding from corporate taxes by halting tax cuts that were scheduled to go into effect over the next few years.

The Democratic proposal also relies on using annual state agency budget cuts called reversions, though the plan estimates those cuts in larger amounts than the state has seen in recent years.

Key points:

  • Use fuel sales tax revenue for roads instead of general fund
  • Freeze planned corporate tax cuts

Want to contact your legislators about an issue that matters to you? Find out how to contact your senators and member of Congress here.

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