Changes at IDEM Prompting Scrutiny

Restructuring within the Indiana Department of Environmental Management is prompting scrutiny across the state.

Amidst accusations that IDEM has completely dropped the agency’s enforcement division, Assistant Commissioner Dan Murry is working to clear up the rumors.

Murry said that over the last four years, the agency had made little improvement in compliance rates among Indiana businesses. According to Murry, this prompted IDEM to start investigating more efficient alternatives.

“We talked with EPA and they had two different models. One [is] where the compliance group is separate from the enforcement group, and that’s the way IDEM had it previously. However, the other half of their regional office across the country had compliance and enforcement together,” Murry said.

This means the compliance inspector, who is out in the field and most familiar with the sources of compliance issues, stays involved throughout the entire resolution process. Although IDEM has billed the restructuring as a way to improve efficiency, the Hoosier Environmental Council is expressing reservations.

Speaking on behalf of the council, senior policy director Tim Maloney said there are concerns surrounding the process through which IDEM initiated the changes.

“Generally speaking, the changes came forward without a lot of communication with stakeholders, affected people or opportunity for public input. That is a concern for a lot of folks,” Maloney said.

Maloney conceded enforcement issues at IDEM predate the current administration. He also acknowledged the Hoosier Environmental Council’s support of IDEM’s attempt at improvement, as long as IDEM produces results.

“We want to make sure that it’s not just change for change’s sake, but will result in real improvement. And there are notable examples; cases where the enforcement process didn’t work,” Maloney said.

Maloney said the jury is still out on whether the restructuring will produce the desired results.

Arianna Prothero

Arianna Prothero started at WFIU as a reporter in May of 2008. She is now the Interim Assistant Radio News Director and, along with her reporting duties, produces WFIU’s Noon Edition and anchors All Things Considered on Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. Arianna holds her bachelor’s degree from Indiana University in Political Science with a minor in Russian and Eastern European Studies.

View all posts by this author »

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media News:

Support For Indiana Public Media Comes From

Search News

Stay Connected

RSS e-mail itunes Facebook Twitter Flickr YouTube

Follow us on Twitter

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media News:

Recent Politics Stories

Recent Videos

Find Us on Facebook