Bloomington’s Water Supply Fine Despite Heat

The heat and lack of rainfall haven't had major effects on Bloomington's water, although Kruzan says they may if another bout of such conditions occurs.

Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan says the city isn’t facing the immediate prospect of water restrictions, despite the recent spell of hot weather. The prolonged high temperatures and lack of rainfall have prompted city leaders in Indianapolis to ask citizens to voluntarily refrain from watering laws this week.

Kruzan says Bloomington hasn’t reached that point yet, although he says another extended period of hot weather without rainfall could prompt the city to reconsider. Kruzan says the city is in the midst of improvements to the municipal water infrastructure that would increase the city’s maximum water capacity to 30 million gallons per day, up from the current 24 million. Kruzan says that plan would take Bloomington through 2025 and beyond.

Kruzan says while the hot weather hasn’t made water rationing necessary, it has affected the taste of the city’s water. He says because of algae growth in Lake Monroe, tap water may taste differently, even though it’s still safe to drink.

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media News:

Support For Indiana Public Media Comes From

Search News

Stay Connected

RSS e-mail itunes Facebook Twitter Flickr YouTube

Follow us on Twitter

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media News:

Recent Politics Stories

Recent Videos

Find Us on Facebook