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Bloomington To Enforce Watering Ban Monday

Bloomington residents will not be allowed to water their lawns from August 13 to October 11.

sprinkler

Photo: Steve White (Flickr)

The city is providing some exceptions to the watering ban including the watering of gardens that produce food.

Bloomington Residents using the city’s water utilities will be under a water ban August 13 through October 11 because of a shortage of treated water.

Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan says the water treatment plant is pumping over capacity and with the students returning to town, a ban was necessary.

“That’s happening before 30,000 people return,” he says. “They’re going to be returning to the IU campus a week earlier than they have in previous years and unfortunately that’s right in the heart of August, so it’s all weather dependent.”

Kruzan says the capacity is 24 milllion gallons per day but the plant is currently pumping more than 25 million gallons per day. He says the high temperatures, combined with high demand, are putting stress on the plant.

Under the ban, all outdoor watering will be prohibited including watering lawns, washing cars, hosing sidewalks or driveways and filling empty pools. Commercial and industrial users may be required to reduce their water use but the city has not specified by how much.

Some exceptions apply. Before 10 a.m. and after 6 p.m. residents may use a hand held hose with a shut-off nozzle to water gardens that grow food for human consumption, trees that have been planted within the last five years and sod or landscaped plants installed within the last 45 days.

Pools that are already filled may be maintained. However ornamental fountains and ponds are prohibited unless they support aquatic life.

Residents violating these restrictions the first time will receive a written warning but will be charged $100 dollars for the next violation, $250 dollars for their third and $500 dollars for each consecutive violation.

Kyle Clayton

Kyle Clayton is a WFIU news producer. He is currently studying journalism at Indiana University and comes to WFIU following an internship in the fall of 2011. After serving in the U.S. Army, he returned home to Indiana in 2008 to begin his education and pursue his interests in writing.

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  • IU faculty

    Are residents being encouraged to report neighbors that are not complying? If yes, how can reports be made?

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