U.S. Attorney Announces Public Corruption Group

The U.S. Attorney says he is teaming up with other federal agencies to tackle public corruption.

Hogsett

Photo: Dan Goldblatt/WFIU News

U.S. Attorney Joe Hogsett (2nd to right) is joined by his deputy attorneys and FBI Special Agent Mike Welch (left) at a press conference last year.

A new group of state and federal agencies led by the U.S. Attorney’s office aims to crack down on public corruption. The Public Corruption Working Group is a joint effort by the U.S. Attorney’s office, the FBI, the State Police, the Department of Labor, the Secret Service and others.

U.S. Attorney Joe Hogsett says his office identified public corruption late last year as an area it wanted to target.  He says ensuring the integrity of office holders is critically important to Hoosiers.

“We don’t care what your politics are. We don’t care who you know. We don’t care who are or who you’ve been,” he says. “If you violate the public trust, you will be identified, you will be investigated and you will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

Hogsett says public awareness of the issue has grown recently in the wake of the prosecution of a Jackson County official and two Indianapolis City-County councilors in the last six months. He adds whistleblowers are key to rooting out public corruption and encourages Hoosiers to call the U.S. Attorney’s public corruption hotline if they have any concerns.

Brandon Smith, IPBS

Brandon Smith, IPBS has previously worked as a reporter and anchor for KBIA Radio in Columbia, MO, and at WSPY Radio in Plano, IL as a show host, reporter, producer and anchor. Brandon graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a Bachelor of Journalism in 2010, with minors in political science and history. He was born and raised in Chicago.

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