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Moment of Indiana History

Posts tagged African American

February 4, 2013

 

poster from 1855 advertising meeting of those in favor of keeping western states such as Kansas free from slavery

A Pocket Of Abolitionism In Fort Wayne

The short-lived "Fort Wayne Standard" suggests that Indiana, despite its mostly conservative political leanings, was also home to more radical political views.

February 14, 2011

 

1960 Republican National Convention

Frank Beckwith for President

Records are scant about the namesake of a little park in Indianapolis. At one time, however, Frank R. Beckwith gave Richard Nixon a run for the money.

October 11, 2010

 

Historic Allen Chapel

Neighborhood Church, Living Monument

While children learned their letters in the basement, Terre Haute's Allen Chapel was home to another sort of underground activity.

February 1, 2010

 

Slavery Before Statehood

A haven for free blacks and runaway slaves by the mid-nineteenth century, Indiana almost legalized slavery at an earlier moment in its history.

September 29, 2008

 

Evansville African American Museum

With its spacious dimensions, pleasant views and various amenities, Lockefield Gardens in Indianapolis distinguished itself among housing projects erected in the 1930s under President Franklin Roosevelt’s Public Works Administration.

February 11, 2008

 

Leveling the Playing Field

One of the ways black students encountered racism in Bloomington in the 1940s was in its eating establishments, many of which illegally refused them service. One undergraduate student was particularly frustrated not to be able to get a quick meal between classes. Although George Taliaferro’s life-sized photo hung inside the Book Nook on Indiana Avenue, the defensive back who had led the Hoosiers to their first Big Ten victory in 1945 had to trek all the way to the west side of town to get fed.

April 23, 2007

 

Island Park Assembly

President Theodore Roosevelt called it “the most American thing in America.” With its passing, it’s been said, “the American middle class in the interior lost something valuable.” The Chautauqua movement brought religion, politics, culture and entertainment to small towns and rural outposts across the United States from the 1870s through the 1920s.

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