Harmonia Early Music

Savall in Istanbul

This week, should we call it Istanbul or Constantinople?

The Hagia Sophia in Instabul. It was built as a Greek Orthodox Church, converted to a mosque in 1453 and now serves as a museum.

Photo: Mediocrity

The Hagia Sophia in Istanbul. It was built as a Greek Orthodox Church, converted to a mosque in 1453 and now serves as a museum.

The phrase “La sublime porte” refers not only to the title of a recent release by Jordi Savall and Hesperion XXI, but also to the historical Ottoman court held by the sultan and his Grand Vizier. During the sixteenth century, the Turkish city Istanbul served as a destination for foreign diplomats to the Ottoman Empire, and artists of every kind. The rule of Suleyman the Magnificent during the sixteenth century brought about the height of the Ottoman Empire in its internal stability, the expanse of its borders, and the variety of its music.

We’ll hear a makam from the CD La Sublime Porte on the Alia Vox label.

La Sublime Porte - Voix d'Istanbul 1430 - 1750
Hesperion XXI / Jordi Savall / Montserrat Figueras
Buy from Amazon »
album cover

La Sublime Porte - Voix d'Istanbul 1430 - 1750
Hesperion XXI / Jordi Savall / Montserrat Figueras
Buy from Amazon »
album cover
Anna Pranger

Anna Pranger moved to Bloomington in 2009 to pursue a degree in music librarianship. Before this, she worked on a degree in music history at the College-Conservatory of Music in Cincinnati, Ohio. She serves as both an assistant producer for Harmonia and the Music Library Assistant for WFIU.

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