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Harmonia Early Music

The Forgotten Kingdom and Lamentations of Jeremiah

Jordi Savall explores music for the Cathars (Alia Vox), and the Tallis Scholars perform Victoria's Lamentations (Gimell).

Les Concerts des Nations

Photo: Courtesy of the Ensemble

Jordi Savall and Les Concerts des Nations in performance.

The Forgotten Kingdom

Jordi Savall’s latest Alia Vox release, “The Forgotten Kingdom,” is yet another special project of epic proportions. In three CDs, he covers over five hundred years of history, music, and poetry related to the Christian religious sect known as Catharism, from its origins and flowering to its persecution and eventual demise.

The performances, an ingenious mix of middle-eastern and western styles, are nothing short of stunning, often revealing a beauty not found elsewhere. “The Forgotten Kingdom” is a powerful testament that is much more than just a recording—it’s a special historical record in and of itself.

Anonymous: Beliche – Istampitta
La Capella Reial de Catalunya and Hesperion XXI/Jordi Savall — The Forgotten Kingdom: The Albigensian Crusade (Alia Vox , 2009)
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album cover

Lamentations of Jeremiah

The Tallis Scholars’ new Lamentations of Jeremiah by Tomas Luis de Victoria is as fine a recording as I’ve ever heard from them. Their performance is moving and finely captures the spirit of the composer’s music and his time.

Directed by Peter Phillips, their Gimell label release also includes Lamentations for Maundy Thurday by Juan de Padilla, a younger contemporary of Victoria’s who made his mark in Mexico, known back then as New Spain.

Tomas Luis de Victoria: Lamentations for Good Friday II
The Tallis Scholars/Peter Phillips — Lamentations of Jeremiah (Gimell, 2010)
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album cover

Anonymous: Beliche – Istampitta
La Capella Reial de Catalunya and Hesperion XXI/Jordi Savall — The Forgotten Kingdom: The Albigensian Crusade (Alia Vox , 2009)
Buy from Amazon »
album cover
Anonymous: Musique Bulgare—Taksim & Danse
La Capella Reial de Catalunya and Hesperion XXI/Jordi Savall — The Forgotten Kingdom: The Albigensian Crusade (Alia Vox , 2009)
Buy from Amazon »
album cover
Tomas Luis de Victoria: Lamentations for Good Friday II
The Tallis Scholars/Peter Phillips — Lamentations of Jeremiah (Gimell, 2010)
Buy from Amazon »
album cover
Juan de Padilla: Lamentations for MaundyThursday
The Tallis Scholars/Peter Phillips — Lamentations of Jeremiah (Gimell, 2010)
Buy from Amazon »
album cover
Bernard Gordillo

Bernard Gordillo was born in Managua, Nicaragua, and raised in New Orleans. He holds degrees from Centenary College of Louisiana, the Early Music Institute at Indiana University, and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama (London). Bernard also writes and hosts the Harmonia Early Music Podcast.

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  • http://www.wikyblog.com/michaelrocor Michael Malloy

    I am delighted to see Early Music is alive and well in your area! For years I was a founding member of the Columbus Cornett and Sacbutt Ensemble but after several key players moved due to employment opportunities it was impossible to recruit replacements. I Columbus we have one remaining Early Music ensemble still carrying the torch: The Early Interval. Ron and Jan Cook have devoted their lives to sharing Early Music with all who wish to hear it. Bravo to them!

    Perhaps some of my former peers are known to people reading this? Craig Kridel – Eric Anderson – Jeff Snedecker – were key members of our ensemble. Very sadly one member passed on seveal years ago: Dick Fuller. Michael Swinger (alto sacbutt) and I (cornetto, natural trumpet) are all that remain here. Mike plays modern trombone in a local community orchestra. I played modern trumpet with that group for several years but recently left it.

    I created and hosted a radio program for WOSU, Columbus, which ran roughly from 1972 to 1974 called “A History of the Trumpet”. After I reached the 20th century the music director suggested I return to older music. The WOSU radio program “Early Music” was born ca. 1974/1975. The study of musicology at the Ohio State University eventually caused me to discontinue the radio work I did for free.

    Michael Malloy
    Columbus, Ohio
    http://www.wikyblog.com/michaelrocor
    “The Baroque Trumpet Revival”

  • Bernard Gordillo

    Dear Michael,

    Thank you very much for stopping by and sharing your story. Early Music is alive not only in our area but throughout North America, thanks to the many musicians, yourself included, who have kept it alive through study and performance.

    Bernard Gordillo

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