Boltonia: Honoring Jim Crockett

A cultivar of our native plant Boltonia was named in honor of Jim Crockett, original host of "The Victory Garden."

white boltonia flowers

Photo: Dan Mullen

Like all baltonias it has small daisy-like flowers and blooms in the fall.

Jim Crockett was the original host of the popular television program “The Victory Garden,” which many gardeners watch. A cultivar of our native plant Boltonia was named in his honor.

Like all baltonias it has small daisy-like flowers and blooms in the fall.

But whereas most boltonias are large stiff stemmed shrubby plants with lance shaped leaves and clouds of little white flowers, ‘Jim Crockett’ is a dwarf form. It has lavender blue daisies with yellow centers and makes a good cut flower. (It is available from catalogs or nurseries.)

Boltonias have smaller flowers than asters but enjoy similar kinds of conditions: full sun and well-drained moist soil, but when established they are drought tolerant.

Plant Your Own

Divide clumps every two to three years. There are eight species in the genus but only one that is suitable for the gardens, and it is B.asteroides. The flowers grow on 4-6ft. plants and are mostly white but can also be pinkish purple.

‘Snowbank’ is a good white cultivar and ‘Pink Beauty’ is a nice pale pink. All are hardy zones 3-9. They are prone to mildew but otherwise trouble free and robust.

As companions for asters and other fall bloomers, boltonias are serviceable and appealing in the garden and in the vase.

And because ‘Jim Crockett’ is a manageable size you may want to have him in your garden too.

Source: www.whiteflowerfarm.com ‘Jim Crockett’

Moya Andrews

, originally from Queensland, Australia, served as Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculties at Indiana University until 2004. In the same year, Moya began hosting Focus on Flowers for WFIU. In addition, Moya does interviews for Profiles, is a member of the Bloomington Hospital Board, and authored Perennials Short and Tall from Indiana University Press.

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  • Barbara

    I planted 4 of this in late June. 3 are lovely – the 4th is dead as a door nail. It's planted only about 2-3 feet from one that's is thriving. Does anyone know what happened? It's planted in a newly installed raised bed, consisting of top soil, mushroom manure and natural mulch. It's been fertilized just like everything else, but now…. only sticks remain! Will it come back next year?? Any help would be appreciated.

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