Earth Eats: Real Food, Green Living

Lucky Foods And Bubbly For New Year’s

Ahead of New Year's, sommelier Brad Dunn talks about champagne, and Chef Daniel Orr prepares lucky dishes with greens, corned beef and black eyed peas.

champagne glass

Photo: JonathanCohen (Flickr)

Champagne isn't just for celebrations anymore. Brad Dunn says it pairs well with popcorn and sushi.

I don’t understand how Americans, as fond as we are of soda pop, that it hasn’t caught on to drink sparkling wine with food.

That’s sommelier Brad Dunn. He came into the Earth Eats studio to talk about the history of champagne and to give suggestions for broadening the appeal of bubbly from just a celebratory drink to something you’d serve with a nice dinner.

We speak with author Maria Finn about how best to use all parts of the fish.

From Harvest Public Media, how this summer’s drought it still wreaking havoc on shipping patterns on the Mississippi River.

And in the kitchen, Chef Daniel Orr prepares three traditionally lucky dishes in anticipation of the New Year — black-eyed peas, corned beef and greens.

Stories On This Episode

Fertilizer On Fast Track Up Mississippi River

shipping-boat

Water levels have fertilizer shippers scrambling to get their product to market before low water dries up their most important shipping route.

Maria Finn: The Whole Fish

maria-finn-the-whole-fish

Feel wasteful when you throw away the heads, skins and bones after a tasty trout dinner? Maria Finn has strategies for using every part of the fish.

Cooking Spinach Two Ways

spinach two ways

In its simplest form, the spinach is wonderful as a warm salad, or you can serve it as a bed for smoked trout, roast beef or sliced veal.

Traditional Corned Beef

corned beef

Celebrate St. Patrick's Day by making your very own corned beef.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad Brings Luck In The New Year

black eyed pea salad

Eating black eyed peas on New Year's Day is thought to bring luck. And since this is a very healthy dish, you will also be guilt-free at the start of 2012.

Annie Corrigan

Annie Corrigan is a producer and announcer for WFIU. In addition to serving as the local voice for NPR's Morning Edition, she produces WFIU's weekly sustainable food program Earth Eats. She earned degrees in oboe performance from Indiana University and Bowling Green State University.

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