Earth Eats: Real Food, Green Living

Michelle Obama Asks US Grocers To Join Her In Fighting Obesity

Michelle Obama spoke with U.S. grocers yesterday, calling for industry-wide improvements to help parents and kids make healthier food decisions.

grocery store aisle

Photo: B Tal

Michelle Obama wants to know that parents' efforts to encourage healthy eating habits won't be undermined every time kids turn on the TV.

First Lady Michelle Obama spoke with the Grocery Manufacturers Association yesterday and called for industry-wide improvements to help parents and kids make healthier food decisions.

Her address is just one more step in her Let’s Move campaign to fight childhood obesity in the U.S.

Among the issues she mentioned on Tuesday were how foods are marketed to kids, the importance of straightforward labeling, and methods used in food engineering. For a more comprehensive run-down of Mrs. Obama’s speech, see Marion Nestle’s list of highlights.

Read the entire speech transcript here.

Megan Meyer

Megan Meyer was in the company of foodies for most of her formative years. She spent all of her teens working at her town's natural food co-op in South Dakota, and later when she moved to Minneapolis, worked as a produce maven for the nation's longest running collectively-managed food co-op. In 2006, she had the distinct pleasure (and pain) of participating the vendanges, or grape harvest, in the Beaujolais terroire of France, where she developed her compulsion to snip off grape clusters wherever they may hang. In the spring of 2008, Megan interned on NPR's Science Desk in Washington, D.C., where she aided in the coverage of science, health and food policy stories. She joined Indiana Public Media in June, 2009.

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  • http://twitter.com/kenleebow Ken Leebow

    It would be nice to think that much will change in the supermarket, however, that would be naive. Upon entering the supermarket, if you are going to make good purchases, I recommend reading the label. Labels can be confusing, however, with a small amount of training, it can be easily accomplished.

    One interesting note: A food label can state zero trans fats…even if that is not true. If a serving contains less than .5 grams of trans fat, be assured it will say zero. Read the ingredients for “partially hydrogenated …”. Oops, trans fat!

    Ken Leebow
    http://www.FeedYourHeadDiet.com

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