Earth Eats: Real Food, Green Living

Bear Meat: Unsafe. (Duh) Eating Chickens, However…

The CDC recently released a study showing that eating bear meat can be risky business, but if you think eating chicken is safer, you might want to think again.

a large bear with an open mouth

Photo: tambako (flickr)

In an analysis performed between 2002 and 2007, researchers found that nearly all of the non-pork cases of trichinosis, a form of intestinal parasite, came from bear meat.

a bear with an open mouth

Photo: tambako (flickr)

The Centers for Disease Control recently released a study showing that eating bear meat can be risky business.

In an analysis performed between 2002 and 2007, researchers found that nearly all of the non-pork cases of trichinosis, a form of intestinal parasite, came from bear meat.

Stay Away From Chicken Too?

Now, that didn’t really surprise us, after all, bear is a pretty rare meat, but the ever-popular chicken is not to be trifled with either.

Consumer Reports tested nearly 400 chickens from 100 stores across the US and found that two-thirds of the samples were infected with either campylobacter or salmonella.

The tests revealed that air-chilled chickens were the cleanest, with only 40% harboring pathogens.  However, most chickens are NOT air chilled, they’re chilled by being dunked into cold, chlorinated water.

Read More:

  • Hazards: Take Care When Ordering Bear for Dinner (NYTimes.com)
  • Chicken survey finds two-thirds harbour salmonella, campylobacter (foodqualitynews.com)
Megan Meyer

Megan Meyer was in the company of foodies for most of her formative years. She spent all of her teens working at her town's natural food co-op in South Dakota, and later when she moved to Minneapolis, worked as a produce maven for the nation's longest running collectively-managed food co-op. In 2006, she had the distinct pleasure (and pain) of participating the vendanges, or grape harvest, in the Beaujolais terroire of France, where she developed her compulsion to snip off grape clusters wherever they may hang. In the spring of 2008, Megan interned on NPR's Science Desk in Washington, D.C., where she aided in the coverage of science, health and food policy stories. She joined Indiana Public Media in June, 2009.

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