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Theatre Of The People-Project F: Review

"Theatre of the People is inclusive. We invite audiences to see 'first timers and seasoned pros' and enjoy each for what they are," says co-founder Hannah Moss.

LittleRed1

Photo: Theatre of the People

Sarah Leaffer as Little Red on her way through the woods to becoming Red Cap!

Event Information

Project F: Freaky Folklore

original adaptations of "Pinocchio" and "Red."


Rose Firebay of the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center

Thursday at 7:30, Friday at 7:30, Saturday at 1:30 and 7:30, and Sunday at 1:30 in the Rose Firebay of the Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center, April 20-23, 2011

Tickets available at the door

Theatre of the People’s latest offering, “Project F: Freaky Folklore,” stages original adaptations Pinocchio and Little Red.

At the beginning co-founder Hannah Moss mentioned the “non profit, inclusive” nature of Theatre of the People and invited the audience to see “first timers and seasoned pros” and to “enjoy each for what they are.”

Pinocchio is adapted from the original novel by Albert Powell and directed by TOP co-founder David Nosko. Owen Walters was the resilient marionette. Yvonne Avery was a supportive, but critical Cricket. Helen Cappanelli and Maggie McCoy, in great face paint and accents that bordered on Brooklynese were pleasures as the Fox and the Cat.

Leslie Boyden was an energy center in a variety of roles. Adrian Cox-Thurmond was a charmer as the street wise, but boy stupid Romeo. The episodic hour and fifteen minutes covers all the episodes that I remember of the story and the repetitions of the behavior lessons that children were supposed to glean. It could use some judicious cutting and focus.

Playwright Ruth Aaron Grove created her Little Red from a variety of folk tales with brief references to “Snow White” and to “Alice in Wonderland.” Her adaptation puts the scene in the texting and face book present and in a woods that has some modern touches as well. Sarah Leaffer as the dutiful “Little Red” sought and gained a bit of wisdom and a change to a slightly more adult name. Lauren Branam was a graceful and thoughtful people hugging tree.

Prince Clever, who wasn’t, was a neat turn by Yvonne Avery. Princess No-Face, a character looking for a character, was the charming Elizabeth Forsythe. Derek Kaellner, in a great costume and even neater face paint than the earlier Fox and Cat, was a delight as the conflicted slavering wolf. Director Hannah Moss was an audience favorite as the mother, the grandmother and most of all as a delightfully energetic witch.

At the theatre for you, I’m George Walker

George Walker

After completing an M.A.T. degree in English at Indiana University, George Walker began announcing for WFIU in 1967. Along with regularly hosting classical music shows, he interviews artists and reviews plays and operas.

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