Give Now

Secretly Canadian Artist Jason Molina Dead At 39

The singer-songwriter died at his home in Indianapolis on March 16, 2013.

a man in a baseball looks into the distance

Photo: publicity image

Jason Molina

On Saturday, March 16, Secretly Canadian artist Jason Molina died in his home in Indianapolis of natural causes, according to a statement by the record label. He was 39.

Molina was best known for his bands Songs: Ohia and Magnolia Electric Co. and his bluesy-folk song stylings. Born in Lorain, Ohio, he moved to Bloomington in 1997 to release an album on Secretly Canadian and quickly became a mainstay at the record label.

“Jason is the cornerstone of Secretly Canadian,” says a statement by the label. “Without him there would be no us – plain and simple. His singular, stirring body of work is the foundation upon which all else has been constructed. After hearing and falling in love with the mysterious voice on his debut single soul in early 1996, we approached him about releasing a single on our newly formed label. For some reason he said yes.”

Over the next several years, Molina toured globally and recorded over a dozen albums, both live and in the studio. Songs: Ohia, a self-titled LP, was his first release on Secretly Canadian, which became his nearly life-long label.

He released several other albums and singles under the same name until he began a new project in 2003, titled Magnolia Electric Co. This band released three full-length albums on the Secretly Canadian label. His final album, Autumn Bird Songs, was released on Graveface Records in October 2012.

Molina battled with severe alcoholism for the latter part of his life. A statement on Magnolia Electric Co.’s website in 2011 revealed his struggles and attempts at rehabilitation. After cancelling a tour in 2009, he stayed out of the public eye in order to take control of his disease.

The untimely death of a talented, creative man is felt strongly by the musical community in Bloomington and by the rest of the lives he touched with his music. “We’re going to miss Jason,” says Magnolia Electric Co.’s statement on his passing. “He was generous. He was a one of a kind. And he had a voice unlike any other.”

 

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media Arts & Music:

Support For Indiana Public Media Comes From

Search Arts and Music

Stay Connected

RSS e-mail itunes Facebook Twitter Flickr YouTube

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media Arts & Music:

Recent Popular Music Stories

Popular Music Events RSS icon

More Events »Submit Your Event »

Arts & Music is on Twitter

Find Us on Facebook

This Week on Poets Weave

Photograph: Father And Grandfather Fishing The Pier…

fishing for perch

O'Neill reads "Anniversary Poem for Ann," "Tectonic of Love," "Photograph: Father and Grandfather Fishing the Pier at Michigan City, and "One Month After."

Read more »

The Poets Weave is a weekly five-minute program of poetry reading hosted by local poet Christopher Citro.

More from The Poets Weave »

This Week on Earth Eats

Judith Barter, Farm Bill Saving (Or Not), Cranberry Cocktail

Doris Lee: Thanksgiving

A conversation about how food and alcohol have been depicted in American art with Judith Barter. Turkeys on the farm. Cranberry cocktail shake-up.

Read more »

Earth Eats is a podcast, radio program and blog of the freshest news and recipes inspired by local food and sustainable agriculture.

More from Earth Eats »

This Week on Focus on Flowers

Thanksgiving Flowers and Leaves

maple leaves

For flower lovers, a Thanksgiving table is not complete without some blooms.

Read more »

Focus on Flowers is a weekly program about flower gardening hosted by master gardener Moya Andews.

More from Focus on Flowers »