Sarasate: Virtuoso Violin Works

Playwright and music critic George Bernard Shaw wrote of Pablo de Sarasate that he “left criticism miles behind him.

Playwright and music critic George Bernard Shaw wrote of Pablo de Sarasate that he “left criticism miles behind him,” and by all contemporary accounts the Spanish violin virtuoso was unique. In this week’s featured recording violinists Gil Shaham and Adele Anthony pay homage to the great Sarasate with a collection of his most outstanding works.

Sarasate contributed no less than 54 published scores. He took particular interest in the field of opera, arranging melodies from works by Gounod, Weber and Mozart, among many others. Opening this recording is a magnificent performance of Sarasate’s Carmen Fantasy, folding together the themes of Bizet’s beloved tale of love and betrayal.

Our quick pick this week is baritone Thomas Hampson’s second installment of his Song of America series, Wondrous Free.

Music Heard On This Episode

Pablo de Sarasate (1844-1908): Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2
Gil Shaham, violin; Akira Eguchi, piano — Sarasate: Virtuoso Violin Works (Canary Classics, 2009)
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album cover
Pablo de Sarasate (1844-1908): Zapateado, Op. 23, No. 2
Gil Shaham, violin; Akira Eguchi, piano — Sarasate: Virtuoso Violin Works (Canary Classics, 2009)
Buy from Amazon »
album cover
Pablo de Sarasate (1844-1908): Introduction and Tarantella, Op. 43
Adele Anthony, violin; Akira Eguchi, piano — Sarasate: Virtuoso Violin Works (Canary Classics, 2009)
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album cover
Pablo de Sarasate (1844-1908): Carmen Fantasy, Op. 25: Moderato
Gil Shaham, violin; Alejandro Posada/Orquesta Sinfónica de Castilla y León — Sarasate: Virtuoso Violin Works (Canary Classics, 2009)
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album cover
Hopkinson, Francis (1737-1791): My Days Have Been So Wondrous Free
Thomas Hampson, baritone; Wolfram Rieger, piano — Wondrous Free (THM, 2009)
album cover
Traditional American: Shenandoah
Thomas Hampson, baritone; Wolfram Rieger, piano — Wondrous Free (THM, 2009)
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David Wood

Originally from Leavenworth, Kansas, David Wood moved to Bloomington in 2005. He received his Bachelor of Music from Kansas State University, and his Master of Music from the University of North Texas. He studied ensemble direction at the Jacobs School of Music's Early Music Institute and joined WFIU in 2006 as an announcer. In 2008 he became WFIU's Music Director and also served as Art Bureau Chief from 2008-2013. David’s interests include Irish music and language (particularly traditional singing), music and religion, running, the outdoors, and, of course, classical music!

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