‘Project M – Madhouse And Mayhem’

Just what an actor is, and what a script represents, become quite unsettling in the play. A thoughtful audience member can come away with a lot to think about.

Ubu Roi

Photo: Hernan Bas

Alfred Jarry’s pre-absurdist 'Ubu Roi', touched off a riot in the theatre during its first production in 1896.

Event Information

Project M-Madhouse Mayhem

Performed by Theater of the People: Six Characters in Search of an Author, by Luigi Pirandello and Ubu Roi, by Alfred Jarry


Rose Firebay of the Waldron Arts Center

October 20-24, 2010

Theater of the People presents Project M – Madhouse and Mayhem as part of their third season, which they’re calling Season Three: The Search for Light.

Art And Inclusion

David Nosko and Hannah Moss are the co-founders of Theater of the People. The first two seasons had their ups and downs, Nosko admits. “Not all traditional theater audiences are too pleased with what TOP’s has been able to achieve across eight shows in two seasons.”

However, Moss affirms both TOP’s mission and its artistic choices. “We are committed to working toward quality theater,” she says. “This season, we’ll do that with a wide variety of art projects. From absurdist work to a 10-minute play compilation from Bloomington playwrights, to a set of children’s fairy tales, TOP is still committed to inclusion, to a mission that enables anyone to participate.”

One Play That Glows, And One That Disturbs

Nosko and Moss share the directing chores for Project M. It was Nosko who picked Alfred Jarry’s pre-absurdist Ubu Roi, a play that touched off a riot in the theater where it was first produced, in 1896. ”It kind of began with a fascination about the piece. I read it and it didn’t seem possible as a stage work, but somehow the thing seemed to glow. As I kept going back to it, I found that it could be done. So far, our actors have been proving me right.”

Six Characters in Search of an Author by Luigi Pirandello is a more established stage work. Yet “it’s really a thoughtful and in some ways disturbing piece,” Moss says. “Just what an actor is, what a script represents, and the separation between the two, become quite unsettling in the play. A thoughtful audience member can come away with a lot to think about.”

George Walker

George Walker was born in Winchester, Virginia, and raised in Owl’s Head, Maine, and Valhalla, New York. After graduating from the University of Michigan, he came to Bloomington in 1966 and completed an M.A.T. degree in English at Indiana University. George began announcing for WFIU in 1967. Currently, along with regularly hosting classical music shows, he interviews artists in a wide variety of areas and reviews plays and operas. He’s the proud father of grown sons Ben Walker (and his wife Elise Katzif Walker) and Aaron Walker. In his time away from WFIU, George enjoys an active life with wife Carolyn Lipson-Walker, singing, reading, exercising and playing guitar.

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