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Hungarian Music for Cello and Piano

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the music Hungary saw a growth and world-wide popularity it hadn’t seen before or since. Composers like Bela Bartok, Franz Liszt and Zoltan Kodaly became household names, at least in the homes of classical music aficionados. On this week’s featured CD, cellist Mark Kosower and pianist Jee-Won Oh celebrate the music written by these composers for the versatile combination of cello and piano

In the “lesser-known composer” category, Kosower and Oh have chosen to highlight three; Erno Dohnanyi, Miklós Rózsa and David Popper. A few weeks ago on this podcast we highlighted a CD featuring the orchestral works of Rozsa, and I recommend you take another listen to it. This week I’ll draw your attention to the cellist and composer David Popper. Popper wrote exclusively for the cello and piano, so it’s seems only fitting he finds his way onto this disc with a serenade and mazurka.

With our quick pick this week, we go from the intimate sounds of cello and piano to the overwhelming force of the full orchestra. Paavo Järvi conducts the Bremen German Chamber Philharmonic in the Symphonies 1 and 5 of Ludwig van Beethoven.

Music Heard On This Episode

Bela Bartok (1881-1945): First Rhapsody: Seconda parte
Mark Kosower, vlc.; Jee-Won Oh, p. — Hungarian Music for Cello and Piano (Naxos, 2008)
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Bela Bartok (1881-1945): First Rhapsody: Seconda parte
Mark Kosower, vlc.; Jee-Won Oh, p. — Hungarian Music for Cello and Piano (Naxos, 2008)
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Erno Dohnanyi (1877-1960): Ruralia Hungarica, Op. 32d
Mark Kosower, vlc.; Jee-Won Oh, p. — Hungarian Music for Cello and Piano (Naxos, 2008)
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David Popper (1843-1913): Serenade, Op. 54, No. 2
Mark Kosower, vlc.; Jee-Won Oh, p. — Hungarian Music for Cello and Piano (Naxos, 2008)
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Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827): Symphony No. 5 in c, Op. 67: Allegro con brio
Paavo Jarvi/Bremen German Chamber Philharmonic — Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 5 (Naxos, 2009)
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Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827): Symphony No. 1 in C, Op. 21: Finale
Paavo Jarvi/Bremen German Chamber Philharmonic — Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 5 (Naxos, 2009)
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David Wood

Originally from Leavenworth, Kansas, David Wood moved to Bloomington in 2005. He received his Bachelor of Music from Kansas State University, and his Master of Music from the University of North Texas. He studied ensemble direction at the Jacobs School of Music's Early Music Institute and joined WFIU in 2006 as an announcer. In 2008 he became WFIU's Music Director and also served as Art Bureau Chief from 2008-2013. David’s interests include Irish music and language (particularly traditional singing), music and religion, running, the outdoors, and, of course, classical music!

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Thanks And Praise

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Gratitude is a theme often explored in early music, and we’ll hear expressions of thanks from a variety of sources on this edition of Harmonia.

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