Four Horns Front And Center

My middle school music teacher said I had the lips for the French horn.

French Horn

Photo: Sadie Hernandez/Flickr

The Columbus Indiana Philharmonic puts horns in the spotlight.

Event Information

Four Horns Front and Center

Columbus Indiana Philharmonic concert featuring the horn section in music of Schumann, Beethoven, and Bach.


Columbus East High School

April 30, 2011 @ 7:30

Tickets available at the door

When the four horns of the Columbus Indiana Philharmonic take the stage for Robert Schumann’s Konzertstück, at least one of the group is a player who hadn’t expected to be there, at least not with a French horn.

Horn player Zach Glavan never planned on being a French horn player. “I was just eleven and I wanted to play the trumpet or the trombone, but my middle school music teacher said I had the lips for the French horn.”

Glavan stuck with the horn through middle school and high school and came to IU to study with Jeff Nelsen. “Talking about Professor Nelsen in a few words is very hard. But one thing that I can say is that he helps students to be able to perform in any situation–from a living room to a huge concert hall–as if they were playing by themselves in a practice room.”

This training will come in handy as Glavan and three other horn players from the Columbus Indiana Philharmonic will be moved from their usual spot in behind the violas and cellos to the front of the stage for Robert Schumann’s Konzertstück for Four Horns.

Philharmonic conductor David Bowden describes the three movement work as” sparkling, soaring, rollicking and demanding.” Glavan says that the demands come from the piece’s period. “In 1848 horn players had set roles and there were players who simply specialized in the high register that the piece asks for. Today’s horn players are more generalists. The arrangement that we’re playing is plenty challenging, but it gives each of the four horn players time in the spotlight.”

Saturday’s program opens with Bach’s Orchestral Suite No. 3, continues with the Konzertstück and concludes with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7.

George Walker

George Walker was born in Winchester, Virginia, and raised in Owl’s Head, Maine, and Valhalla, New York. After graduating from the University of Michigan, he came to Bloomington in 1966 and completed an M.A.T. degree in English at Indiana University. George began announcing for WFIU in 1967. Currently, along with regularly hosting classical music shows, he interviews artists in a wide variety of areas and reviews plays and operas. He’s the proud father of grown sons Ben Walker (and his wife Elise Katzif Walker) and Aaron Walker. In his time away from WFIU, George enjoys an active life with wife Carolyn Lipson-Walker, singing, reading, exercising and playing guitar.

View all posts by this author »

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media Arts & Music:

Support For Indiana Public Media Comes From

Search Arts and Music

Stay Connected

RSS e-mail itunes Facebook Twitter Flickr YouTube

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media Arts & Music:

Recent Classical Music Stories

Classical Music Events RSS icon

More Events »Submit Your Event »

Arts & Music is on Twitter

Find Us on Facebook

This Week on Harmonia Early Music

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

The Tailor

"Tinker, Tailor, / Soldier, Sailor, / Rich Man, Poor Man, / Beggar Man, Thief..."

Read more »

Harmonia Early Music is a nationally syndicated weekly early music radio program, podcast and blog produced by WFIU Public Radio.

More from Harmonia »