Give Now

Beethoven Quartets With A Personal Appeal

The Pacifica Quartet in concert at the Jacobs School of Music.

two men and one woman stand as a third man sets on a stool. members of the pacifica quartet.

Photo: Pacifica Quartet

The Pacifica Quartet: Simin Ganatra and Sibbi Bernhardsson, violins, Masumi Per Rostad viola, and Brandon Vamos, cello

Event Information

Pacifica String Quartet

Beethoven: Quartet in G, Op. 18, No. 2; Quartet in E-flat, Op. 74 ‘Harp;” Quartet in c-sharp minor Op. 131


Auer Hall

Sunday September 18, 2011 at 4 pm

This is the year of Beethoven for the award-winning Pacifica Quartet. They’re bringing three of his quartets to the Jacobs School of Music at Auer Hall.

From The Early Work To The Late

Although the Pacifica’s concert is all Beethoven, the quartets span twenty-five years. First violinist Simin Ganatra says, “We begin with a fairly early quartet. The ‘No. 2′ is our favorite from Opus 18. It has real conversational elements, and we get to interact in different characters.”

The second quartet is a middle work. “Opus 74 is nicknamed ‘The Harp’ quartet. In the first movement, while I’m holding chords, the three others pass a melody around as they all play pizzicato.”

The major work of the afternoon is the Op. 131, No. 14. After hearing it, Franz Schubert is reported to have said, ‘After this, what is left to write?’ Ganatra acknowledges that Beethoven also thought it was one of his best works.

“The quartet is such an incredible emotional journey, and so well crafted. It’s a seven-movement work where there are no stops. What’s amazing is how he gets from one part to the next. Beethoven sort of transforms the melody, and suddenly you’re in a new character.”

Each Speaks

Ganatra sums up Beethoven’s appeal as a personal one. “The quartets still speak to people in a very personal way. I think it’s the personal element in his music that really brings so many of us to truly love it. Playing Beethoven is one of the greatest pleasures for a string quartet.”

 

George Walker

After completing an M.A.T. degree in English at Indiana University, George Walker began announcing for WFIU in 1967. Along with regularly hosting classical music shows, he interviews artists and reviews plays and operas.

View all posts by this author »

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media Arts & Music:

Support For Indiana Public Media Comes From

Search Arts and Music

Stay Connected

RSS e-mail itunes Facebook Twitter Flickr YouTube

What is RSS? RSS makes it possible to subscribe to a website's updates instead of visiting it by delivering new posts to your RSS reader automatically. Choose to receive some or all of the updates from Indiana Public Media Arts & Music:

Recent Classical Music Stories

Classical Music Events RSS icon

More Events »Submit Your Event »

Arts & Music is on Twitter

Find Us on Facebook

This Week on Harmonia Early Music

Thanks And Praise

saint cecilia

Gratitude is a theme often explored in early music, and we’ll hear expressions of thanks from a variety of sources on this edition of Harmonia.

Read more »

Harmonia Early Music is a nationally syndicated weekly early music radio program, podcast and blog produced by WFIU Public Radio.

More from Harmonia »