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Posts tagged weight

October 31, 2006

 

a little girl plays in a cardboard box

Weighted Toys

Some scientists say putting a extra weight in toys can put a little more exercise into your kids' playtime.

September 23, 2006

 

a woman sleeping in her bed

Sleep Less, Weigh More

America is obsessed with diets, but sometimes gaining weight is more complex than calories in versus calories burned.

January 23, 2006

 

sky_diver

Dancing in Air

A skydiver's body is in a delicate balance. Gravity tugs her downward with a constant, relentless force, while air resistance pushes her upward.

December 26, 2005

 

Race for the cure participants walk and run down a city street.

Running Vs. Walking: Which Is Better For You?

Is it true that running a mile and walking a mile burn about the same number of calories?

November 27, 2005

 

Bowling Down

Drop two objects of different mass, say a bowling ball and a golf ball, from a high building. Which hits the ground first? Learn more on this Moment of Science.

November 23, 2005

 

Haul Me Up or Haul You Down?

We’ve been imagining that we’re sitting in a geostationary satellite. That’s a satellite that orbits the equator at the same speed and direction as the earth turns. That means it’s always over the same spot of land, as if it were floating in the sky 22,500 miles up. We let down a rope to pull up some supplies. Will this work? Learn more on this Moment of Science.

November 23, 2005

 

A Wider Rope, Scotty

Are you familiar with a geostationary satellite? That’s a satellite that orbits the equator at the same speed as the earth turns, so it’s always over the same spot of land, 22,500 miles up. Could you let down a rope and pull up some supplies? Learn more on this Moment of Science.

November 23, 2005

 

Rope Me Up, Scotty

A geostationary satellite orbits the equator in the same direction and speed the earth turns. That means the satellite stays stationary with respect to the ground. It seems to be hanging in mid-air, if by mid-air, you mean 22,500 miles high. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

September 15, 2005

 

Penny Stack

Here's a question of burning scientific importance: How high can you stack pennies before they fall over?

June 27, 2005

 

No Pressure

Some very adventurous people have used big suction cups to climb the fronts of glass buildings. However, they’d better not climb too high, because the higher you go, the less effective a suction cup will be. In space they’re no good at all! Learn more on this Moment of Science.

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