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Posts tagged teeth

August 7, 2007

 

Neanderthal teeth fragments

Giving Neanderthal a Hand

Were Neanderthals right or left handed? Learn more on this Moment of Science.

February 23, 2007

 

soda on ice with a straw

Something’s Rotten

Drinking pop all day may not be a healthy habit, but can soda actually rot your teeth?

August 18, 2005

 

Pregnancy and Tooth Loss

Pregnancy can be a wonderful experience. There’s the rosy glow, the growing baby’s thrilling first kick. Of course, being pregnant has its down side. There’s morning sickness, after all, and then ultimately the painful process of actually giving birth. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

August 4, 2005

 

Tongue Thrust

When a person doesn’t swallow correctly, it’s called a tongue thrust because the tongue, one of the most powerful muscles in the body, thrusts against the teeth when swallowing, over time forcing them out of alignment. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

June 16, 2005

 

How Wise Are “Wisdom Teeth”?

As we all learned in health class, human beings have 32 teeth. Twenty-eight of them come in before puberty, but the last four teeth, our “third molars,” usually come in during our late teens or early 20′s, when we’re presumably older and wiser, hence their nickname, wisdom teeth. Lean more on this Moment of Science.

November 19, 2004

 

Grow Your Own Dentures

Learn how to grow your own dentures on this Moment of Science.

February 5, 2004

 

T-Rex Skeleton

What Does a T. Rex Eat?

When dinosaurs ruled the earth, the Tyrannosaurus Rex ate just about anything it wanted. But did that include other T. Rex?

September 27, 2003

 

Does Sugar Cause Cavities?

Does sugar really cause cavities? Find out on A Moment of Science.

September 27, 2003

 

Bruxism

If you are grinding your teeth you could be wearing the enamel down, as well as causing damage to your jaw. When we’re asleep, we’re capable of grinding our teeth six times as hard as we might in the day. That kind of pressure can do a lot of damage.

September 27, 2003

 

Bacteria that Fight Tooth Decay

Most tooth decay is caused by a strain of bacteria called Streptococcus mutans. It consumes sugar on the surface of the teeth and converts it into lactic acid, which is what eats away tooth enamel, causing decay.

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