A Moment of Science

Posts tagged orbit

December 19, 2006

 

a cup of teh tarik

Teh Tarik

Have you ever tried this Malaysian favorite? We've heard that it's out of this world. Literally!

December 19, 2006

 

asteriods Ida and Dactyl

Below the Belt

What is the difference between an asteroid and a comet?

November 30, 2006

 

Earthrise

Earthrise

If you were standing on the moon would you really get to see the earth rise and set?

May 2, 2006

 

mars

Never Thought to Ask (Planets)

Where did the nine planets that orbit our sun come from?

March 8, 2006

 

uranus_sign

Beyond That Planet

Nowadays everybody knows there are nine planets in our solar system, but that information was hard won.

January 2, 2006

 

Zoom!

You’re out on a clear, starry night with your best friend, looking for shooting stars. Look, there’s one, your friend shouts, but by the time you look, it’s gone. There’s another, she cries. Too late, you missed it. Then one comes along that seems to just amble across the sky, nice and slow. Why is it that some shooting stars are so fast and others are much slower? Learn more on this Moment of Science.

December 2, 2005

 

The Tenth Planet?

On last count, there were nine planets in our solar system: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. Soon, however, we might need to add a tenth planet to the solar lineup. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

November 23, 2005

 

Rope Me Up, Scotty

A geostationary satellite orbits the equator in the same direction and speed the earth turns. That means the satellite stays stationary with respect to the ground. It seems to be hanging in mid-air, if by mid-air, you mean 22,500 miles high. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

May 20, 2005

 

Close One

In 1987 an asteroid measuring a half a mile in diameter came by, missing our planet by a measly six orbital hours. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

March 17, 2005

 

Moon Envy

Why does earth only have one moon, while other planets have many? Jupiter alone has nearly 40 moons! Learn more on this Moment of Science.

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