A Moment of Science

Posts tagged migration

July 2, 2013

 

salmon swimming in the river

Salmon Have An Internal Compass

Sockeye salmon are sensitive to Earth's magnetic pull. Scientists discovered that salmon use a trick called "geomagnetic imprinting" to find their way home.

March 22, 2011

 

arctic tern calling for it's mate

How Do Birds Migrate And Reach Their Destination Without A Map?

Can you imagine traveling 22,000 miles without a map? The Arctic Tern's migration is one of the longest migrations in the animal kingdom.

June 24, 2008

 

A Godwit flying

Longest Non-stop Bird Flight Ever Recorded

A female godwit has logged the longest non-stop bird flight ever recorded. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

May 2, 2007

 

Countless birds sit on a tree limbs.

Assisted Migration: Global Warming To Cause Early Migration

As you probably already know, when climate changes, life changes with it. But recent alterations in the Earth's climate could have very damaging consequences.

April 15, 2007

 

a dragonfly in flight

Dragonfly Migration

Scientists try to crack the mystery of dragonfly migrations.

January 2, 2007

 

Sooty Shearwaters flying over the water's surface.

The Longest Migration On Record: Sooty Shearwaters

You probably haven't heard of the Sooty Shearwater. This creature can travel 40,000 miles in just 200 days, which is the longest migration we have on record.

December 23, 2003

 

Digestion and Migration

If you thought birds were amazing before, wait until you hear what they put their bodies through in order to migrate.

September 27, 2003

 

Butterflies and Their Magnetic Compasses

Millions of monarch butterflies fly southwest from eastern Canada and the United States down to Mexico each autumn; then millions more fly back to the northeast in the spring.The one-way trip is as long as 2500 miles for some of these creatures.

September 27, 2003

 

How Cells Get Around

This means that instead of staying in one place, the cancer cells migrate from their original site to other parts of the body.

September 27, 2003

 

Lemmings Love Life

Do lemmings really follow each other off a cliff to their death? No, but there are mysteries surrounding the rodents. Over the years, there have been many tales of these Arctic rodents voluntarily jumping off cliffs and plummeting into the sea.

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