A Moment of Science

Posts tagged insect

July 11, 2006

 

spider on paper bill

Bugs and Money

You probably had no idea that pests could be so valuable.

May 22, 2006

 

assassin_bug

Assassin Bugs

Though most true bugs eat plant sap, some feed on animals. One such true bug is the assassin bug, which feeds on fellow insects.

May 22, 2006

 

stink_bug

Is That Bug Really a Bug?

True bugs are distinguished from other insects by the structure of their mouthparts and the way they feed.

March 21, 2006

 

a hirtella plant stem and leaves

Trap-building Ants

Many studies are done on ant behavior, but these amazing Amazonian ants are especially tricky.

July 7, 2005

 

Climbing the Walls

It’s such a common sight, you probably don’t think twice. You swat at the fly buzzing around your head, and it seeks refuge on the ceiling. You stomp at an ant crawling along the baseboard, and it escapes by climbing the wall. Insects seem to respect the law of gravity about as much as someone with diplomatic immunity respects a local jaywalking ordinance. How do they get away with it? Learn more on this Moment of Science.

April 6, 2004

 

caterpillar

Pine Processional Caterpillars Know How To Stay In Line

Find out about the animals that travels long distances in a single-file line head-to tail.

September 27, 2003

 

A Static Fly Trap

The hope is that as the fly walks across the surface, its little body charges up, allowing poisonous spores to stick to its body like metal shavings to a magnet. If this happens, then soon enough, the fly will walk no more.

September 27, 2003

 

Which Hurts More, Horseflies or Mosquitoes?

The difference in pain is due to the way each insect obtains blood. Mosquitoes have mouth parts that are highly modified for piercing; they have a sharp proboscis, a prominent tube-like part that extends from their head and houses organs known as stylets which work like hypodermic needles to penetrate the skin and suck up your blood.

September 27, 2003

 

Fighting Off Bug Diseases

Here’s how innate immunity works. In your bug body there is a fluid called hemolymph, which is equivalent to human blood. If you’re injured, components in the hemolymph interact with specialized cells in your immune system to clot and form a scab that seals off your wound and prevents infection.

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