A Moment of Science

Posts tagged equator

January 17, 2013

 

compass in black

What Is The Difference Between A Mile And A Nautical Mile?

A Moment of Science would like to clarify a small point of navigation: the difference between a mile on land and a nautical mile.

May 31, 2012

 

christopher_columbus

Trade in Your Wind

Does the wind have anything to do with the rotation of the earth?

July 3, 2007

 

Tracking and data relay satellite in hangar

A Three Foot Orbit

Science tells you that you weigh less standing on the equator than you do at the north pole. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

June 29, 2007

 

Person On Bathroom Scale

The Equatorial Weight-loss Program

You've tried all sorts of diets, you work out regularly, and you avoid fatty foods, yet still nothing seems to take off those extra pounds eh?

May 8, 2006

 

flags_wind

Why the Wind Blows

We will answer that question, with a question. How fast does the earth turn?

November 23, 2005

 

Haul Me Up or Haul You Down?

We’ve been imagining that we’re sitting in a geostationary satellite. That’s a satellite that orbits the equator at the same speed and direction as the earth turns. That means it’s always over the same spot of land, as if it were floating in the sky 22,500 miles up. We let down a rope to pull up some supplies. Will this work? Learn more on this Moment of Science.

November 23, 2005

 

A Wider Rope, Scotty

Are you familiar with a geostationary satellite? That’s a satellite that orbits the equator at the same speed as the earth turns, so it’s always over the same spot of land, 22,500 miles up. Could you let down a rope and pull up some supplies? Learn more on this Moment of Science.

November 23, 2005

 

Rope Me Up, Scotty

A geostationary satellite orbits the equator in the same direction and speed the earth turns. That means the satellite stays stationary with respect to the ground. It seems to be hanging in mid-air, if by mid-air, you mean 22,500 miles high. Learn more on this Moment of Science.

June 16, 2005

 

Miles High

What is the highest point on earth, highest meaning the farthest away from the earth’s center? Learn more on this Moment of Science.

May 12, 2005

 

Grab a Toga

The Greeks had it figured out that the earth was round. How did they manage it? Learn more on this Moment of Science.

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